The young man's career advice thread
#41
(01-23-2020, 05:56 AM)Suits Wrote:
(01-23-2020, 05:36 AM)Navyblue42 Wrote: Thanks to everyone for their input earlier. Ended up cancelling the interview.

I had an interview Monday for an inside sales position and I got called in for training next week. Looking forward to it and definitely glad I passed on the first gig. This one seems much more promising

Glad to hear it.

I've been working this job since this post, I've worked all the way through Covid. I was paid a flat rate weekly, I was just put on commission last week. My pay has increased 50% since then, at this rate I will be nearing 6 figures annually (if I can keep it up). I'm out performing most dudes in my office who have been there for a handful of years. I've never made this much money before, and it's actually a lot of fun.

I contribute my sales skills 100% to my several years of going out. Leading a customer and leading a girl share a lot of similarities. Closing a client you've been in contact with for weeks or months, is like finally banging the girl you've been on-off with. Super gratifying
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#42
I’ve had a few PMs recently about guys wanting to get into the skilled trades, I was thinking about creating a chat group for guys who are looking for a career change and who are serious about getting into a new line of work in the coming months. Ive helped a ton of guys do this in Canada and also a few in the US, it’s a relatively straightforward process. If anyone is interested in this and you live in Canada or the US (UK and Australia could also work) just shoot me a PM and we can figure something out.
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#43
(01-12-2020, 10:20 PM)ChicagoFire Wrote: I agree with poster above me either coding or sales. I'd add study a subject that you are good at to complement sales or coding (or even both). The world is changing RAPIDLY. College IMO stopped being important decades ago, the internet makes it easy to study hard subjects. You don't want to be in a field that will be automated and/or competing with illegals like culinary arts. Unless something changed Google doesn't require a degree anymore. I'd highly recommend checking out Future Skills podcast, the book Wikinomics, and Average is Over. Wall street playboys is ok but some of their content you have to take with a grain of salt. 

/Snip/

I heard about that as well 20 years ago from one of my calculus teacher in college.  Story goes is that while they did not really care about your educational back ground, you were required to answer two questions before you get a face-to-face with someone.  Question 1 asked about how to code for a certain problem, which was something that required manipulating a a data structure.(all that I remember was that you need to use arrays to solve the coding problem)  Question two was to mathematically prove the formula for calculating a sphere.  That second question pertained to our calculus class which is why our instructor brought it up.  Ironically, I would have had trouble answering that even after his class until today, when I just saw the proof in my old calculus book that I was flipping threw while bored at my stay-at-home job.  

To answer the larger overarching questions of this thread my two cents is that no, you don't need a college education to be a successful person in life.  Certifications have really made college more or less moot for the majority of jobs in Corporate America.  Add the guest worker programs, and the only way that a company knows that anyone is moderately competent is if they passed the test to get the certification, which is both an indictment on our colleges and on our immigration system.  Experience from a reputable company is more important to the rest of Corporate America than where you went to get your name written in calligraphy on a piece of paper.  

Having said that, if you are determined to go to college, then have a plan as to what you are going to do with that degree, and have a plan as to exactly how to pay for it.  State funded schools are a perfectly fine education and going to Jr College is only looked down on by people that you don't want to associate with anyways.  Going to a private school that is not part of the "Ivy League" will get you exactly NOTHING more than what you would have gotten from a standard state college.  Tech degrees have been in demand since the concept of college was started, so the STEM degrees are usually a good bet.  I can't say if it is worth going into debt for, but a lot better than going into debt for other degrees.  Everything else should be on the cheap.  For example: they used to have full ride scholarships for people to major in education(which really is a minor and you get a degree in something like History) when I went to college, and of course became a teacher for a period of time.  Not sure if that is an option now, but if you insist on getting that humanities degree, then at least get the state to pay for it.  Military is a good way to pay for any degree IMHO, and if you plan on going the career officer route, you can major in anything that has the most pussy for all that it matters.  That is assuming that you are not trying to become a pilot or a MASH doctor, then you need to take the classes that I was talking about above.  Student Loans are worse than credit cards these days when it comes to debt, so avoid them like the Plaque.(the real one not this Corona Bullshit)  

I would caution that whatever anyone does, with their life, make it your object to be the man who is considered to be "irreplaceable" at work.  Not only do you know your particular job, but the more that you can competently perform in other areas of the organization, the more valuable that you are.  Any time that they offer to train you on something, take it seriously and do it.  If you need to follow up, go to the instructor and follow up.  Anytime a new system comes online, if you are not part of the implementation, than most likely you are slated for the next lay-off, which leads me to my next point.

Knowing how the employment game works is just as important as your certification, education, etc.  I know more than a few competent people who would excel at a certain job, but since they don't know how to manage their managers or companies, they either get taken advantage of and stuck in a dead end job for the rest of their life, or even worse laid off.  I include myself in this as well.   Lay-offs are an unfortunate part of life, and part of the employment game.  Getting prepared for a lay-off is more important than if you get laid off.  I believe that Roberto said something similar to this:  "The best employee an employer can have is the employee who pisses their money away on frivolous shit, and are reliant on the job that I provide.  The worst employees are the ones who have their finances set up so well that they can quit on the spot."  Not many people have that power, and if more people had, the workplace would be a completely different environment.
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#44
So I have been thinking about this and was wondering if anyone could offer advice. I'm in my early twenties, and I'm almost finished with my Bachelors in Computer Science. I've also done several internships. I got into CS because I'm good at math/logic problems, but I don't particulary enjoy sitting in front of a computer 8 hours a day and coding/going to meetings/being apart of the coporate culture. I've never tried working with my hands, but have a feeling I'd enjoy it. I was thinking about joining the Air Force and doing some type of aircraft mechanical work, after I finish my degree of course. What are your thoughts on this?
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#45
(11-03-2020, 06:35 AM)terrific Wrote: So I have been thinking about this and was wondering if anyone could offer advice. I'm in my early twenties, and I'm almost finished with my Bachelors in Computer Science. I've also done several internships. I got into CS because I'm good at math/logic problems, but I don't particulary enjoy sitting in front of a computer 8 hours a day and coding/going to meetings/being apart of the coporate culture. I've never tried working with my hands, but have a feeling I'd enjoy it. I was thinking about joining the Air Force and doing some type of aircraft mechanical work, after I finish my degree of course. What are your thoughts on this?

While you are still in school, see if there is a class that you can take that will let you work with your hands.  You don't need to take an official credited class at your college either.  I will bet that there is a wood working/ auto mechanics class in a Jr. College nearby.  A mechanic that I used to go to got a econonics degree at a very good school down here, and as far as I can tell, never used it outside of his mechanic shop.  Given how intricate the CS systems are in a lot of vehicles/appliances, I am sure that if you land a job with your hands, that you may still use your CS degree, just not in the same way that someone writing code in an office would.  

If you are interested in the Air Force, take a look at it, you can probably do more than just be a gear head for them.  I had a buddy in college with an Electrical Engineering degree that was in Navy ROTC.  He ended up in their flight program, flying sub hunters.  Air Force is seriously lacking in all staff,(Short by 2K pilots last that I heard, I don't know about other staff positions, but I doubt that they are fully staffed in other fields like intelligence, CSC, etc.) so there are a lot of doors that they have open with someone with a tech degree.  The caveat is that one should make sure that the military is EXACTLY what you are looking for, so interview people that you know that either were in the Air Force or most importantly in it right now that is not your recruiter.  Also note that the military today is not like it was even 10 years ago.
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#46
(11-03-2020, 06:35 AM)terrific Wrote: So I have been thinking about this and was wondering if anyone could offer advice. I'm in my early twenties, and I'm almost finished with my Bachelors in Computer Science. I've also done several internships. I got into CS because I'm good at math/logic problems, but I don't particulary enjoy sitting in front of a computer 8 hours a day and coding/going to meetings/being apart of the coporate culture. I've never tried working with my hands, but have a feeling I'd enjoy it. I was thinking about joining the Air Force and doing some type of aircraft mechanical work, after I finish my degree of course. What are your thoughts on this?

You are in a great position.  You are self aware and can see into your future.  Don't let the bastards drag you down.

When I was your age, I decided to get out of physical dirty work and ramp up my tech/sci side... which went very well.  I still help with all that, because I am a good son, but my passion lies elsewhere. Not to say anything else about it, but H.R. Giger is my favorite artist (aside of Rembrant and Crowley : - ) 

A man with a dream of success (whatever it may be to him) is aces over anyone else's picture they want to paint him into.
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#47
(05-09-2020, 01:36 AM)Navyblue42 Wrote:
(01-23-2020, 05:56 AM)Suits Wrote:
(01-23-2020, 05:36 AM)Navyblue42 Wrote: Thanks to everyone for their input earlier. Ended up cancelling the interview.

I had an interview Monday for an inside sales position and I got called in for training next week. Looking forward to it and definitely glad I passed on the first gig. This one seems much more promising

Glad to hear it.

I've been working this job since this post, I've worked all the way through Covid. I was paid a flat rate weekly, I was just put on commission last week. My pay has increased 50% since then, at this rate I will be nearing 6 figures annually (if I can keep it up). I'm out performing most dudes in my office who have been there for a handful of years. I've never made this much money before, and it's actually a lot of fun.

I contribute my sales skills 100% to my several years of going out. Leading a customer and leading a girl share a lot of similarities. Closing a client you've been in contact with for weeks or months, is like finally banging the girl you've been on-off with. Super gratifying

This put a smile on my face, getting your first few fat commissions are such a rush. Best advice I can give you from here on out is to make a plan for saving and investing your bonuses. I've worked with too many people who really cashed in but it only ever seemed to go towards booze, whores and debt.
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#48
(11-03-2020, 06:35 AM)terrific Wrote: So I have been thinking about this and was wondering if anyone could offer advice. I'm in my early twenties, and I'm almost finished with my Bachelors in Computer Science. I've also done several internships. I got into CS because I'm good at math/logic problems, but I don't particulary enjoy sitting in front of a computer 8 hours a day and coding/going to meetings/being apart of the coporate culture. I've never tried working with my hands, but have a feeling I'd enjoy it. I was thinking about joining the Air Force and doing some type of aircraft mechanical work, after I finish my degree of course. What are your thoughts on this?

If you want to join the AF (which I would recommend) i would immediately go to the nearest AF ROTC department and ask how you can join. I assume it would mean stretching out your bachelor degree to complete the ROTC program. So probably get a double major. If this this possible, do it (but do it at the lowest cost to you as possible). If this is not an option (I don't see why it wouldnt be an option) then complete the CS degree as normal and after graduating apply for OTS. You will have a decent shot with a nice CS degree. I would take a year or two off to go teach in Asia and explore around the region. After that if you didn't get selected for OTS then come back to the states and enlist.
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#49
Quote:who really cashed in but it only ever seemed to go towards booze, whores and debt.

Terrible. Gotta stay away from debt.
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#50
(11-07-2020, 02:39 PM)WombRaider Wrote:
Quote:who really cashed in but it only ever seemed to go towards booze, whores and debt.

Terrible. Gotta stay away from debt.

Booze and whores are great, though.
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#51
Hahaha quiet you cunts, I was making a point
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#52
(11-03-2020, 06:35 AM)terrific Wrote: So I have been thinking about this and was wondering if anyone could offer advice. I'm in my early twenties, and I'm almost finished with my Bachelors in Computer Science. I've also done several internships. I got into CS because I'm good at math/logic problems, but I don't particulary enjoy sitting in front of a computer 8 hours a day and coding/going to meetings/being apart of the coporate culture. I've never tried working with my hands, but have a feeling I'd enjoy it. I was thinking about joining the Air Force and doing some type of aircraft mechanical work, after I finish my degree of course. What are your thoughts on this?

The world is your oyster with a CS degree, assuming you're a halfway decent coder and went to a decent school. 

Hit up job fairs and alumni networks. Again assuming your university is halfway decent, companies will be recruiting for entry level roles at the fairs. The economy will likely be less shit by next spring (when these fairs usually occur) and the options will be pretty good. 

I would recommend going for a sales engineering or consulting role at one of the big firms if that is possible for you. I completely get not wanting to spend your life coding. There are a lot of roles that require engineering knowledge but are a lot more customer-facing and enjoyable. You'll be around more young people and women, not just other male engineers. The pay won't be as good as a straight up software engineer but it could still be pretty good (high five figs entry level in any large city). 

With that being said I wouldn't sleep on being a software engineer either. The money is ridiculous if you get into the right company. You're talking a 120K base with fantastic stock options and bonuses if you get into an Amazon or a Google. Say what you will about aspie virgin coders but that kind of money is nothing to sneeze it, it's basically financial stability and wealth for the rest of your life if you play your cards right. 

With COVID you'll be working from home so you'll avoid most corporate BS and politics.
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#53
Fellow Swoopers...

I'm in a unique situation and would appreciate your guys' advice. 

Background: I graduated this past May with a degree in Computer Information Systems with a good GPA (3.5+) and am currently working as a data analyst with a reputable company. In the last few months that I've been working here, I've been feeling burned out by having to sit in front of a computer for 8 hours a day basically migrating reports from one platform to another (Power BI). 

Now don't get me wrong, the company is really good and somewhat "anti-corporate" in that people here don't wear masks and communicate to each other like regular humans. However, I've been doing a lot of thinking, and really I can't really see myself staying in the corporate world and working my way up the ladder for the rest of my life. 

Now, this is where I've thought up of a potential alternative, which would be to take over my father's business, more specifically, he owns a gas station/convenience store that is an independent brand. 
 
Pros: 
  • The different tasks throughout the day. Basically, you're not just sitting in front of a computer all-day -- you ring up customers, drive to the bank, monitor inventory, do heavy lifting, etc.. 
  • flexible hours 
  • No corporate BS.
Cons: 
  • Not a very "glamorous" job. 

  • Chances of robbery. (Happens once in a while but fortunately, nothing major yet.) 
  • Unreliable vendors/suppliers. 
Overall, I feel like being a business owner would be more meaningful work and that, I feel, is what can make me look forward to working for the next several decades. 

What do you guys think? 
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#54
I reckon I'd get bored as shit chained to a petrol station all day. If I had your skill set I'd be honing my craft while learning sales/marketing so I could eventually bill out as an independent consultant.
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#55
(11-13-2020, 01:19 AM)Baltimore Bachelor Wrote: Fellow Swoopers...

I'm in a unique situation and would appreciate your guys' advice. 

Background: I graduated this past May with a degree in Computer Information Systems with a good GPA (3.5+) and am currently working as a data analyst with a reputable company. In the last few months that I've been working here, I've been feeling burned out by having to sit in front of a computer for 8 hours a day basically migrating reports from one platform to another (Power BI). 

Now don't get me wrong, the company is really good and somewhat "anti-corporate" in that people here don't wear masks and communicate to each other like regular humans. However, I've been doing a lot of thinking, and really I can't really see myself staying in the corporate world and working my way up the ladder for the rest of my life. 

Now, this is where I've thought up of a potential alternative, which would be to take over my father's business, more specifically, he owns a gas station/convenience store that is an independent brand. 
 
Pros: 
  • The different tasks throughout the day. Basically, you're not just sitting in front of a computer all-day -- you ring up customers, drive to the bank, monitor inventory, do heavy lifting, etc.. 
  • flexible hours 
  • No corporate BS.
Cons: 
  • Not a very "glamorous" job. 

  • Chances of robbery. (Happens once in a while but fortunately, nothing major yet.) 
  • Unreliable vendors/suppliers. 
Overall, I feel like being a business owner would be more meaningful work and that, I feel, is what can make me look forward to working for the next several decades. 

What do you guys think? 

You are looking at this wrong. First you need to self evaluate. 

What are your goals? 

What brings you happiness?

What do you want to gain in this life?

How would you like to see yourself in 20-40 years from now?

What is life success to you? 

Once you answer those questions, then and only then can you begin to determine what type of job/career you want to have or would accept.
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#56
Shit that's got me thinking as well Dash.

I always got annoyed at getting asked about my 5-year plan in job interviews, because I never really had one. I still don't, but my life changed when I started asking myself where I want to be in 20 years, because it definitely wasn't at the place my current career is likely to lead.

That was the catalyst for a lot of changes that I am still making.
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#57
I recommend everyone to have short, mid and long term goals.

Which are based around things that bring you happiness and make you a better person.

How else can we properly make decisions without them?

Would be really hard as things you do NOW can have significant implications for things well into the future.
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#58
(11-13-2020, 01:19 AM)Baltimore Bachelor Wrote: Overall, I feel like being a business owner would be more meaningful work and that, I feel, is what can make me look forward to working for the next several decades. 

What do you guys think? 

Being the business owner should mean you take the profit. And make the decisions that hopefully bring in more profit. Not that you do the menial shit. That's what staff are for!

If it's a money spinner, I'd definately look at taking it over but with an eye to it being a semi passive income to supplement my other hustles.
They who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety- Benjamin Franklin, as if you didn't know...
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#59
Id rather pay someone half the store's profit to run the shop day in and day out than for me to have to be tied down to it.

Time > Money
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#60
(11-13-2020, 06:35 AM)Dash Wrote: I recommend everyone to have short, mid and long term goals.

Which are based around things that bring you happiness and make you a better person.

How else can we properly make decisions without them?

Would be really hard as things you do NOW can have significant implications for things well into the future.

You know what, you're absolutely right.

I've got long term goals and immediate goals but I don't have anything keeping me accountible in the mid term.

Thanks for posting this.
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