I'm in the market for a new car.
#1
Suggestions?

Ideally, I'd like to keep the car payment under $300 and have it paid off in five years time. I can put 20% down.

Currently looking at a Hyundai Accent. Most of my relatives have driven Hyundai vehicles for a decade and their experiences seem to be very positive.

Thoughts?
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#2
Why buy a car when you can get one used and avoid loans outright?
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#3
(06-16-2019, 11:35 PM)081287 Wrote: Thoughts?

I have one. You want the terrorists to win. 

Either buy American, or German. Get a Tahoe. If thats to big, get a BMW. One that starts with M. 

Cars are a blast. Don't get it twisted, bitches love cars. If you want some white church girl with a hairy bush, fine, get your stupid Hyndai. If you want to bang stripper types, you can't drive a hyndai. There'll tear you apart, and that thing will get repoed. You want to be respected. Tahoe, Escalade, Yukon. The first thing they talk about in the locker room is what kind of car the guy they blew last night drove. Trust me. Kim Jong Un makes Hyndais and he doesn't even drive one. 

I hate sounding so harsh, but this is tough love brah. 

Aloha!
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#4
I can vouch for Hyundai Accent. My family has owned one for 20 years now and it's never required any repairs at all, literally not a single visit to the mechanic ever (other than the government-mandated, uneventful yearly checkup, of course).

A great brand for sure like most of South Korean products, and usually manufactured domestically as well!
"It's easy to swing another's dick through thorns." 
- Croatian proverb
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#5
Do not go into debt to buy a car.
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#6
(06-17-2019, 10:11 AM)Ski Pro Wrote: Do not go into debt to buy a car.

I'm going to disagree with SkiPro here. There's nothing wrong with buying a somewhat new or new car, as long as it's reliable and Not some Korean POS (all Korean brands) or German car with a soon-to-expire warranty. 

Buying a car cash means you have limited options if you don't have a lot of money. Buying a car with 100K+ miles or a minor wreck might be cheap but you're going to spend out of the ass in repairs and unreliability. The water pump might go out during a summer day, the alternator decide to Rawmeo itself outside of your office, the radiator decides to take a shit when you're heading on a date, and the list is endless. All of these happened to me and my car between 110-150K miles, and it was a Japanese vehicle! Bought it at 60K miles and currently at 220K miles. Before that I owned a Camry between 150-240K miles and it went through an AC compressor, alternator, manifold, some exhaust shit, and a couple of other things I forgot. Bought it for 4K USD cash at 150K miles because "don't want muh debt". Oh yeah, the engine said fuck it and that was that. 

I'd say go into manageable debt, something you know you can pay easily. That 5K hooptie is going to need some repairs, and if you account for all the repairs, it might cost the same amount you paid for the car. Get yourself a Toyota, boring but reliable as fuck. Germans are nice until the warranty expires, they start to break down often after 55K miles. Big SUVs that Kona mentioned are nice.


Yo Kona, I'm currently between a current model Z71 burban and a F15 X5....both are around the same price yet the interiors look so different. That Chevy dashboard looks so, ancient tho for being 30-40K. Thought about a GS F Lexus but I can't use it for long drives or sleep in it comfortably.
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#7
I agree with Cattle Rustler. I like predictability in things that I rely on and would rather give up a little money for a little time, so there's value in a new car to me. Used cars tend to mean surprises that aren't under warranty with lots of shop visits, and a lot of handy modern features are obsolete at two to five years these days anyway.

Hyundai has come a long way from where their quality control was 15 years ago and makes some models that look like real class acts, but the Accent isn't one of them. I was going to put the girlfriend in an Elantra Value Edition after the Elantra she drove when we met was ready to die, and really liked what I saw, but ended up negotiating a Toyota for her because they let me drive the payment into the ground so she can never complain about it. If you're looking for a smallish car that will still reliable in five years, take a serious look at the new Corollas.

Here's a strategy to try: go to your local dealer when the new model year has really turned over, September/October, even November, and try to negotiate a deal on last year's model. Then, shotgun-blast an email to every regional dealer with the specs you settled on, but only specify your color as "I would prefer [this color]", and ask for their best price. Several will respond, and you can pit them against each other. If you want black and can only find it at $24k, tell them the neon yellow another dealer bid down to $22k is your second choice and ask them to match it.

I emailed eight, got three bids, did two rounds of price-matching, and they delivered the car to her house for free.
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#8
Stay out of debt. Take the 20% and go onto ebay and autotrader and look for the best deal you can find in your area. Yes, 4K does get you an ok car. Also you will save on tax and insurance. Listen to someone who has done it the wrong way.

You might get two or three years payment free out of such a car with a few repairs here and there. You will have zero debt from day one till the end.
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#9
I can't be 100% sure on how successful everyone in this thread is, but from what I can tell, the most successful posters are all encouraging OP not to go into debt to buy a car.

Interdasting.
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#10
I could find you hundreds of examples, but this one will do.  

Here is a car that is likely to cost you nothing.  And just in case you believe that a new Accent is somehow a better image than this old Suzuki, it isn't.  Literally no one gives a shit about you buying a new Accent except the dealer.  In a new Accent you just look like another wage slave, in a 10 year old Suzuki you look like a fun guy who doesn't worry about what people think and is making smart financial decisions.  

https://www.ebay.com/itm/2008-Suzuki-Ren...SwroJcwz53

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbftLWeaRMQ
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#11
Honestly, I think it's excessive car payments that fuck young guys up the most. Our cultures are so automobile-intensive and the male biology so that guys can't get the idea of driving something shiny and new out of their head.

Housing you have to pay for one way or another. Being close enough to good paying jobs is going to cost you if you don't wanna do a 5 hour commute every day, but there's no reason to shell out for new car until you've "made it."

If a guy doesn't know what he could do with an extra $300 a month that would put him in a position to buy all the Hyundais he could ever want 15 years down the road, then he needs to stop salivating over fancy grills and starting thinking hard about the concepts of supply and demand.

[Image: 3546511072_9c8b1bde19.jpg]
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#12
These guys are right.

Going into debt to buy a new car is fucking dumb. It loses about 20% of its value the first year.... Let some other chump drive those miles and take the hit.

Also, buying a new Hyundai sedan puts you right in the cube-jockey provider category. Terrible choice.

And besides, even if you had a truly baller car, you'll catch your girl peepin' and getting moist for a dude who pulled up in the next lane on a vintage motorcycle.

Ten years ago I bought a VW Jetta, and it hurt more than it helped. I would've done a lot better with an old 4runner or 90's model Jeep Cherokee Sport. Maybe a Tahoe, like Kona advised. Even a Jeep Wrangler or Suzuki Sidekick if you're a 'fun' guy.

These cars are simple, inexpensive, rugged and not faggy. Cars as status symbols are lame and for most guys it's better for your vehicle to be economical as possible and status neutral. You're not impressing anyone with a midlevel Korean sedan; better for your wallet and self-identity to go in the other direction and subcommunicate that you're not playing the car-status game.

You can get great deals on high mileage cars (~100K), you just need to be smart about it.

You need to ask for service records to make sure that fluids (oil, coolant, brake, transmission) have been changed regularly. I'd also check that these items would have been recently serviced:

New water pump.
New timing belt
New fuel filter. 

Last, check the tread on the tires.

Invest that money or spend it on other things that make life worth living.
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#13
(06-17-2019, 01:31 PM)Cattle Rustler Wrote: Yo Kona, I'm currently between a current model Z71 burban and a F15 X5....both are around the same price yet the interiors look so different. That Chevy dashboard looks so, ancient tho for being 30-40K. Thought about a GS F Lexus but I can't use it for long drives or sleep in it comfortably.

I just upgraded the SUV a couple months ago. I just have the LTZ Tahoe. I couldn't be happier. 

Now, I also have an M4. It requires frequent trips to the dealer. I drove a few X5's. Wow, I like them. Tons of power, and all computery. Thing is, and it will probably be different for you, the maintenance requires me to go to the only dealer on the island. That place isn't the size of a mainland dealer so they are slow. Hence, I'm still on the Tahoe. There are several Chevy dealers here. 

Its a tough call. 

Aloha!
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#14
(06-18-2019, 01:59 AM)Suits Wrote: I can't be 100% sure on how successful everyone in this thread is, but from what I can tell, the most successful posters are all encouraging OP not to go into debt to buy a car.

Interdasting.

Cash is better, but for a lot of people, if they don't finance something, they'll be financing something else. Auto debt is secured and low-interest and so not the worst choice if you're going for a car that has a reasonable track record of reliability and value retention.

To put it another way, losing 20% off the lot + 5% per year for five years may be less harmful than paying 18% for five years putting other expenses on a credit card, especially when you factor in maintenance on a used car that's out of warranty.

It becomes a progressively worse idea the more you're spending on appearances, but it's very much situational. In the story above about negotiating the girlfriend's new Toyota, I had to stop her when her monthly maintenance costs started averaging over $100. She'd also literally run the value out of it - I had to have a wrecker haul it away just to get $100. The financing on something new was a massive incremental improvement for her and eliminated a lot of hassle at relatively little additional cost.
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#15
(06-17-2019, 06:08 AM)Kona Wrote:
(06-16-2019, 11:35 PM)081287 Wrote: Thoughts?

I have one. You want the terrorists to win. 

Either buy American, or German. Get a Tahoe. If thats to big, get a BMW. One that starts with M. 

Cars are a blast. Don't get it twisted, bitches love cars. If you want some white church girl with a hairy bush, fine, get your stupid Hyndai. If you want to bang stripper types, you can't drive a hyndai. There'll tear you apart, and that thing will get repoed. You want to be respected. Tahoe, Escalade, Yukon. The first thing they talk about in the locker room is what kind of car the guy they blew last night drove. Trust me. Kim Jong Un makes Hyndais and he doesn't even drive one. 

I hate sounding so harsh, but this is tough love brah. 

Aloha!

Have you seen the grill on the new Mercedes AMG models ?

I would have a hard time picking a BMW over this

[Image: 005-2019-mercedes-amg-c63-coupe.jpg]

Also, if your going for a budget car I know some people who Uber on the weekend to make their car payments and then a little extra. If you live in a big city might be an option.
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#16
(06-17-2019, 06:08 AM)Kona Wrote:
(06-16-2019, 11:35 PM)081287 Wrote: Thoughts?

I have one. You want the terrorists to win. 

Either buy American, or German. Get a Tahoe. If thats to big, get a BMW. One that starts with M. 

Cars are a blast. Don't get it twisted, bitches love cars. If you want some white church girl with a hairy bush, fine, get your stupid Hyndai. If you want to bang stripper types, you can't drive a hyndai. There'll tear you apart, and that thing will get repoed. You want to be respected. Tahoe, Escalade, Yukon. The first thing they talk about in the locker room is what kind of car the guy they blew last night drove. Trust me. Kim Jong Un makes Hyndais and he doesn't even drive one. 

I hate sounding so harsh, but this is tough love brah. 

Aloha!
I love this new forum for this post

(06-18-2019, 03:07 AM)billydingdong Wrote: These guys are right.

Going into debt to buy a new car is fucking dumb. It loses about 20% of its value the first year.... Let some other chump drive those miles and take the hit.

Also, buying a new Hyundai sedan puts you right in the cube-jockey provider category. Terrible choice.

And besides, even if you had a truly baller car, you'll catch your girl peepin' and getting moist for a dude who pulled up in the next lane on a vintage motorcycle.

Ten years ago I bought a VW Jetta, and it hurt more than it helped.  I would've done a lot better with an old 4runner or 90's model Jeep Cherokee Sport. Maybe a Tahoe, like Kona advised. Even a Jeep Wrangler or Suzuki Sidekick if you're a 'fun' guy.

These cars are simple, inexpensive, rugged and not faggy. Cars as status symbols are lame and for most guys it's better for your vehicle to be economical as possible and status neutral. You're not impressing anyone with a midlevel Korean sedan; better for your wallet and self-identity to go in the other direction and subcommunicate that you're not playing the car-status game.

You can get great deals on high mileage cars (~100K), you just need to be smart about it.

You need to ask for service records to make sure that fluids (oil, coolant, brake, transmission) have been changed regularly.  I'd also  check that these  items would have been recently serviced:

New water pump.
New timing belt
New fuel filter. 

Last, check the tread on the tires.

Invest that money or spend it on other things that make life worth living.
This is a great point.  Motorbikes are cheaper and way cooler.  I picked up both my bikes combined  for way less than what I spent on my day to day car and every time I ride them they give me so much happiness.  Chicks love bikes too.
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#17
One way to gain the reliability advantage of buying new while avoiding the big initial depreciation is to get a lease transfer.

Essentially somebody else has leased the car and paid off a decent number of months, you just take over the remainder and can do what you want at the end of the lease.  Often times they'll throw in additional cash incentives to sweeten the deal or winter tires that they're going to have no use for otherwise if you live in the north.

If you get one that's close to the end of the lease (usually the best deals still have around a year left, less than that and the owner will probably just opt to finish off the lease), a massive amount of the initial cost hit is taken by somebody else.  Meanwhile you get a near-new car with often less mileage than allowed under the lease agreement (one of my gearhead friends even said he considers any car with less than 30K miles to be new condition-wise). 

Furthermore, to ensure you're not picking up a lemon, go to a dealership with the owner and pay yourself the $120 or so for a full ~130 point or whatever inspection.  Get the inspection results in writing (they often have a green-yellow-red colour coded checklist), and come to an agreement that anything identified as failing either gets repaired by the owner or is covered by the initial warranty.  

Here's an example of a site that facilitates this (there are others too):

https://www.leasetrader.com/
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#18
Lease deals are the biggest con ever. ‘Low monthly payments’ fool idiots into signing up for a brand new car when really all they are doing is paying the massive first three years depreciation, before the car goes back (and a savvy buyer snaps it up) and they start the cycle again, cause it’s their only option.
They who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety- Benjamin Franklin, as if you didn't know...
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#19
I appreciate all the input gentlemen.

Still exploring my options and remaining non-commital.
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#20
(06-19-2019, 01:07 AM)Stealth Wrote: One way to gain the reliability advantage of buying new while avoiding the big initial depreciation is to get a lease transfer.

Essentially somebody else has leased the car and paid off a decent number of months, you just take over the remainder and can do what you want at the end of the lease.  Often times they'll throw in additional cash incentives to sweeten the deal or winter tires that they're going to have no use for otherwise if you live in the north.

If you get one that's close to the end of the lease (usually the best deals still have around a year left, less than that and the owner will probably just opt to finish off the lease), a massive amount of the initial cost hit is taken by somebody else.  Meanwhile you get a near-new car with often less mileage than allowed under the lease agreement (one of my gearhead friends even said he considers any car with less than 30K miles to be new condition-wise). 

Furthermore, to ensure you're not picking up a lemon, go to a dealership with the owner and pay yourself the $120 or so for a full ~130 point or whatever inspection.  Get the inspection results in writing (they often have a green-yellow-red colour coded checklist), and come to an agreement that anything identified as failing either gets repaired by the owner or is covered by the initial warranty.  

Here's an example of a site that facilitates this (there are others too):

https://www.leasetrader.com/

This actually looks really interesting.  One of the worst parts of leasing is the downpayment up front (downpayment on something you dont even own gtfo), and it looks like in many cases here you can bypass most or all of that.  

I had a thread on RVF about possibly buying a new car a year or two ago. . .. so far just been coasting on my paid off car running it to the ground, but this could be an option.
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