Red Meat...yay or nay?
#1
I used to read on Roosh forums that guys should drink alot of water, lift more weights, and eat red meat.

On another forum, I read that red meat is bad because "clogging of arteries due to the high amount of fat and enzymes that fukk up your blood pressure coupled with digested hormones in the meat all have an adverse effect on your bloodflow to your dikk and your overall health"

What is your guys opinion on all of this?
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#2
The b12 and cholesterol in red meat is vital for mental health, energy levels, and testosterone production.

You can make a case against any type of good. But the pros outweigh the cons with red meat (and especially organ meat).
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#3
What's definitely bad is veganism, and lacto-vegetarian is also dubious because it will be missing arachidonic acids and low on omega-3 fatty acids, unless dairy cows are grass fed. Red meat definitely has arachidonic acid, but only has omega-3 fatty acids if cows are grass-fed. Cold water fatty fish (sardines, wild caught salmon, chub mackeral, etc) have both these nutrients in quantity. I almost never eat meat but I eat sardines every other day, at least.

Wild caught salmon is from cans. Fresh salmon is almost always farmed, though naturally restaurants lie about this. Chub mackerel is the cheap stuff in cans. Expensive Atlantic mackerel at restaurants is full of mercury. You can also find chub mackerel in cat food, if you are on a low budget. Seriously, cat food is more nutritious than what the average American eats, though lacking in vitamin C. which cats can synthesize but not humans.

As for B12, that can be easily obtained from pills, and should be obtained from pills for older people, who need extra.
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#4
eat what you want in moderation if you care about health.

not eating something at all that you want is a pretty shitty existence.
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#5
Processed red meat intake - for example, hotdogs and hamburgers - is strongly linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly colon cancer, although there's also a connection between others such as prostate, rectal, kidney, and bladder cancer. 

Unprocessed red meats, however, such as beef are much safer. But it's best to avoid cooking red meat in high temperature such as in an open flame as that can form HAAs, which are cancer promoting. 

One thing you can do to reduce the negative effects of the cancer-promoting HAAs is by consuming red meat alongside anti-inflammatory foods, such as vegetables and fruit.

Still, it's better to stick primarily to white meat and (fatty) fish, although there's nothing wrong with some unprocessed red meat once in a while.
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#6
Personally I never felt any better when I was eating steak and eggs every day than when I eat oily fish and eggs. And fish is cheaper and easier as it comes in tins...

I feel far better on both (along with green vegetables) than when I ate copious amounts of bread and pasta.
They who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety- Benjamin Franklin, as if you didn't know...
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#7
(06-12-2019, 10:06 AM)Beest Wrote: Processed red meat intake - for example, hotdogs and hamburgers

Ground beef (hamburgers) is not Processed Meat. It's just raw beef put through a grinder.

Processed meat is bacon, sausages, hot dogs, ham, salami, lunch meats etc. Thing that have been cured, salted, have additives etc.
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#8
When I said avoid Atlantic mackerel, I meant Spanish or King Mackerel, which is what fancy restaurants serve. Atlantic and Pacific chub mackerels are similar, and are the cheap stuff in cans and cat food.
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#9
(06-12-2019, 11:32 AM)GlobalMan Wrote:
(06-12-2019, 10:06 AM)Beest Wrote: Processed red meat intake - for example, hotdogs and hamburgers

Ground beef (hamburgers) is not Processed Meat. It's just raw beef put through a grinder.

Processed meat is bacon, sausages, hot dogs, ham, salami, lunch meats etc. Thing that have been cured, salted, have additives etc.

Correct, but I'm referring to a hamburger from let's say McDonalds
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#10
It's so easy to make your own hamburgers, and it taste way better than even the ritziest burger joints.
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#11
People want you to belive what they believe.

Everything in moderation and you'll be fine.

There's ALWAYS going to be some study for and against read meat.

Get your bloodwork done quarterly and monitor your levels.

I agree, avoid processed meats, cook your own meat if possible.

Grass Fed non GMO free range beef is the best + add some bison burget meat and it's the best burgers out there you can make yourself.
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#12
i eat plenty of red meat.

Quality is everything.
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#13
I probably won't eat much beef anymore in steak form, to get a decent steak in Canada you need to pay at least $15+ for a medium sized steak. If you buy the cheaper cuts you can chop them up and throw them on the BBQ as kebabs though.
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#14
(06-12-2019, 07:17 PM)kaotic Wrote: People want you to belive what they believe.

Everything in moderation and you'll be fine.

You just want me to believe this!
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#15
If you look up the literature on the implications of red meat consumption on health, you'll find that it's pretty muddy.

For example, this meta analysis of 9 cohort studies finds that high intake of unprocessed red meat increased mortality in US populations, but not in European and Asian ones. To me this means that there's another factor, not inherent to red meat, that increased mortality risk for the US populations.

You can see the same ambiguity if you look at colon cancer, which was mentioned here previously and is often cited as the main health risk associated with high red meat intake. This is from the Wikipedia page (epidemiology section): 

Quote:Starting in the 1970s, dietary recommendations to prevent colorectal cancer often included increasing the consumption of whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and reducing the intake of red meat and processed meats. This was based on animal studies and retrospective observational studies. However, large scale prospective studies have failed to demonstrate a significant protective effect, and due to the multiple causes of cancer and the complexity of studying correlations between diet and health, it is uncertain whether any specific dietary interventions (outside of eating a healthy diet) will have significant protective effects. In 2018 the National Cancer Institute stated that "There is no reliable evidence that a diet started in adulthood that is low in fat and meat and high in fiber, fruits, and vegetables reduces the risk of CRC by a clinically important degree."


Even if you ignore this ambiguity and and look at population studies that do find an increased risk of colon cancer due to high red meat intake, that increased risk might not be that meaningful for most people. For example, this meta-analysis reports that consuming red meat 5 times a week increased the risk of colon cancer by 13%. This may sound like a lot, but given that the average American has a 5% chance to be diagnosed with this kind of cancer at some point in life, eating red meat 5 times a week would supposedly raise it to a 5.65% chance instead. Probably not enough to motivate a major diet restriction for most people. And compare that to smoking, which increases the risk of dying of lung cancer (among other types) by more than 2,000%.
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#16
Fuck yay.

I eat a ton of red meat. You know what helps? Lots of fiber.

I would also add lots of fiber to your diet which helps make that red meat even more effective.
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#17
(06-14-2019, 02:48 AM)The Beast1 Wrote: Fuck yay.

I eat a ton of red meat. You know what helps? Lots of fiber.

I would also add lots of fiber to your diet which helps make that red meat even more effective.

Definitely, I add a scoop pf psyllium fiber to my lunch time smoothie. I couldn't do without it now.
"Women however should get a spanking at least once a week by their husbands and boyfriends - that should be mandated by law" - Zelcorpion

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#18
If you like the taste of meat, eat it.
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#19
(06-14-2019, 10:15 AM)Greenman Wrote:
(06-14-2019, 02:48 AM)The Beast1 Wrote: Fuck yay.

I eat a ton of red meat. You know what helps? Lots of fiber.

I would also add lots of fiber to your diet which helps make that red meat even more effective.

Definitely, I add a scoop pf psyllium fiber to my lunch time smoothie. I couldn't do without it now.

I take my psyllium before bed. Just the powder and water. It's known in my house as, "poop juice" because straight psyllium is f**king nasty.
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#20
This gives a good overview of the methodological issues with nutrition studies: https://examine.com/nutrition/red-meat-i...r-you-now/

The conclusion in general is that there is little evidence that is certain on red meat and it's best to just try it yourself since people are different and many mechanisms are into play.

Great site by the way, check out the other articles as well.
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