Travel-Friendly Careers
#1
(06-02-2019, 04:08 PM)Scotian Wrote: I have a pretty decent career, lots of other high earners here including a couple of millionaires that I know of, we’re a diverse crowd, diversity is our strength!

FYI, Scotian earned reknown for informing people about oil careers.  https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-9826.html

I'm skeptical about the oil industry, because opportunities are highly cyclical, dependent on the price of oil.  A career involves skill acquisition that should provide stable, sustainable opportunities.  So post your travel-friendly careers here.  Offhand, a flight attendant seems like one, albeit low-paying.  Cruise ships might provide opportunities, but you are competing with third-world labor.

There are definite trade-offs to travel.  It probably isn't something you want to do forever.  For example, it is tough to raise kids.  If you don't retire as an expatriate, then you must return alone, or get a foreign wife.  Of course, if you never travel then you miss opportunities to explore your interests.  My point is that there are trade-offs that merit discussion.  If you just want to explore quickly, then it makes sense to be a broke, travel bum for a couple years.  If you enjoy it, then you can invest in a longer career.  But if you don't plan, they you risk approaching middle-age, broke and single, in some third-world shithole.
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#2
Programming
IT
Teaching
Military
Engineering
Pilots
Real Estate

Fyi

Broke and single as a white dude in the 3rd world is prob still more fun and interesting than your normal male working a 9-5 in the West.
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#3
Oil is still a decent option but obviously not as good as it was when a barrel was worth $100.
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#4
(06-07-2019, 06:01 PM)Dash Wrote: Broke and single as a white dude in the 3rd world is prob still more fun and interesting than your normal male working a 9-5 in the West.

Probably, but only up to a point. Assuming that you end up living at a good number of years, the general expense of staying within an acceptable range of comfort are only going to escalate as you get older.

We're seeing this with at least one of the Swoop Founders, who is looking for a better income source than just selling books, not because the income from that has died off, but rather because what is an acceptable income at a younger age, just simply stops being an acceptable income as you age.

From my perspective, there's definitely a risk at arriving at age 40, look around yourself and realize that although you've had adventures, you really have nothing to call you own and that you envy those who do.

I think for men (and women), it's important to have a purpose that gives us a reason to get out of bed. Because if the day comes that simply seeing new places and meeting new people no longer provides the same level of satisfaction that it used to, it's going to be pretty hard to build something from the ground up later in life.

A number of the guys I've gotten to know in this corner of the Internet are men, who like me, were able to seek a balance between travel, adventure and career development by teaching a limited amount of hours in China and working on side-hustles up to 40 hours a week.

Not a perfect solution, but its been a nice happy medium for myself and others that I know. I've been able to live an adventurous life while steadily building an innovative company with unique products that I can be proud of. I'm not quite there yet (several key products are just now finishing the development process, so I still need to figure out how to sell them), but the ability to pursue the goals I want to pursue has been incredible. A traditional 9-5 never would have left much room for doing projects on the side and I got to live in a unique and fascinating country throughout the process.
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#5
(06-07-2019, 06:29 PM)Suits Wrote:
(06-07-2019, 06:01 PM)Dash Wrote: Broke and single as a white dude in the 3rd world is prob still more fun and interesting than your normal male working a 9-5 in the West.

Probably, but only up to a point. Assuming that you end up living at a good number of years, the general expense of staying within an acceptable range of comfort are only going to escalate as you get older.

We're seeing this with at least one of the Swoop Founders, who is looking for a better income source than just selling books, not because the income from that has died off, but rather because what is an acceptable income at a younger age, just simply stops being an acceptable income as you age.

From my perspective, there's definitely a risk at arriving at age 40, look around yourself and realize that although you've had adventures, you really have nothing to call you own and that you envy those who do.

I think for men (and women), it's important to have a purpose that gives us a reason to get out of bed. Because if the day comes that simply seeing new places and meeting new people no longer provides the same level of satisfaction that it used to, it's going to be pretty hard to build something from the ground up later in life.

A number of the guys I've gotten to know in this corner of the Internet are men, who like me, were able to seek a balance between travel, adventure and career development by teaching a limited amount of hours in China and working on side-hustles up to 40 hours a week.

Not a perfect solution, but its been a nice happy medium for myself and others that I know. I've been able to live an adventurous life while steadily building an innovative company with unique products that I can be proud of. I'm not quite there yet (several key products are just now finishing the development process, so I still need to figure out how to sell them), but the ability to pursue the goals I want to pursue has been incredible. A traditional 9-5 never would have left much room for doing projects on the side and I got to live in a unique and fascinating country throughout the process.

I'd recommend any guy to try to keep a happy medium / balance. 

Too far in either direction is adding an unnecessary risk factor. 

Important to have realistic plans for sustainability if one chooses travel and adventure. 

At the end of the day, each man knows what he wants in life, what his dreams are, what makes him happy.

That's the things we must pursue.
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#6
The one challenge that comes with a primary focus on "seeing the world" is that it is hard to become knowledgeable in an area of business.

Seriously, B2B businesses usually have far more potential that B2C (because literally everyone seems to think that they can make a better mousetrap, whether it be a new food&beverage product, original book, t-shirt design or board game). If you become knowledgeable in an area of commerce, you'll become aware of mousetraps that need to be better, but haven't because not that many people know about them.

There are mid-sized database software companies that have only 4-5 customers worldwide and they make good money with no change to that expected on the horizon. That's because they fulfil a very niche need that certain customers are willing to pay big money for. A friend of mine in university worked with one such product at his part-time students job and when he graduated, he got hired by the company that created the database software, because he had a high level of experience with the product relatively speaking and it would be impossible to hire someone off the street with no experience without training taking essentially a year or more just to get the new hire up to speed.

Imagine if my friend spotted some problems with this product and knew how to improve on them. He could launch a competing product and have virtually no serious competition, because only a handful of people worldwide even understand the product.

There's a huge difference between that and having an idea for a better soft drink. Sure, you're idea might be better tasting than Coke or Pepsi, but that means absolutely nothing, because the big players in that industry aren't #1 because they have the best drink. They are #1 because they have the strongest brand.

Good luck competing with major existing consumer products and good luck having a creative enough idea to have a shot in hell of creating something that beats the odds.

Sure, it's been done before, but more have failed than succeeded.

As you get into your thirties and later your forties and still have the desire to travel, if you're like many men, sooner or later, you're going to have the desire to create a business/source of income that allows to continue having the freedom to travel (or at least live life on your own terms) long into the future.

If you have no work experience other than short term jobs that funded your budget travel, you're probably unlikely to happen on an idea that has a competitive chance as a business.
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#7
(06-07-2019, 06:01 PM)Dash Wrote: Programming/IT  YES
Teaching  NO.  This requires local certifications.
Military   YES.  Add in government State Department jobs for sure.
Engineering Maybe, depending on the specialty.
Pilots  YES, except that international pilots require extensive flight training, i.e., thousands of hours.
Real Estate  NO.  This requires local knowledge and connections.
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#8
It's not difficult to make a decent online income these days. I've been location independent for 12 years. When I first started my business in ecommerce I would do some ad-hoc telemarketing as I had some soul crushing jobs in UK , surprisingly the experience came in use; I would sit in my apartment in Eastern Europe in my underwear making sales calls for a few hours for between $20—25 per hour, boring as hell but if I did a full day I could pay half my rent for the month. Guys in London were doing the same work, paying 30% tax, extortionate rents, and spending any left over money on banging ropey English girls and snorting coke.

A good thing about getting into business is avoiding tax from your own country, register in some tax haven.

It feels good to have been location independent for such a long period of time and be almost bulletproof; travelling the world with just my laptop and know how.

The biggest challenge these days is not becoming too comfortable and pushing myself.

Now I'm becoming older, I'm looking for more meaning in life, and some tangible achievements. When you get to you forties, it's now or never.
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#9
(06-07-2019, 08:37 PM)klh Wrote:
(06-07-2019, 06:01 PM)Dash Wrote: Programming/IT  YES
Teaching  NO.  This requires local certifications.
Military   YES.  Add in government State Department jobs for sure.
Engineering Maybe, depending on the specialty.
Pilots  YES, except that international pilots require extensive flight training, i.e., thousands of hours.
Real Estate  NO.  This requires local knowledge and connections.

Teaching doesnt require local certifications. 

It requires one of more of the following 1) Being from an English speaking country 2) Holding a teaching license from home country 3) Online TEFL

Real Estate doesn't require local knowledge and connections

I wasn't talking about international real estate. I was talking about real estate in one's home country.
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#10
(06-08-2019, 12:26 AM)Dash Wrote: Teaching doesn't require local certifications. 

Real Estate doesn't require local knowledge and connections ... in one's home country.

Teaching depends on the country and subject.

There are lots of bad part-time real estate agents.  Obviously, you can't serve clients, close deals, or build a business while travelling.  But it is flexible enough to travel while business is slow, and work extra when business is good.  You must still pay fees to maintain a realtor license while travelling.  High volume agents can negotiate better commission deals.
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#11
I'm an international school teacher.  Teaching always caught a lot of hate on the other forum, but I think it's a career that can be right for some people.  

The benefits of this career are as follows:
  • Relatively good pay- I can attempt to break salary ranges down into five very rough ranges. Keep in mind, not all international school offers are good offers from a financial standpoint:
    1. $20,000-$35,000/year plus housing in some Latin American locations and SE Asian entry-level positions
    2. $35,000-$55,000 in second and third-tier Chinese cities, Saigon and Hanoi, Jakarta, Costa Rica, Panama City, Lima, lower-tier Bangkok schools, most European schools, lower tier Singapore, South Korea, Manila, Kazakhstan, most of the Middle East (Big area, I know). The top school in Bogota pays around $40-55k (See below)
    3. $55,000-$80,000 in better Chinese schools, lower-tier Singapore, mid to upper-tier Bangkok, the UAE, Qatar, Kazakhstan, Moscow, Paris, London, etc. (Have fun going broke in London!)
    4. $80,000-$110,000- Top tier schools in large expat hubs like Singapore, Bangkok (Yes! ISB tops out at $107,000 per year, as do a few others), Angola, Saudi Aramco schools, and expensive countries like Norway, Japan, and Switzerland.  
    5. $110,000- $160,000- This range is for administrative positions (principal, vice principal) in groups 3 and 4. School general directors will make more because they're more like CEOs.

    I've been doing this for about a decade and I'm now worth somewhere in the mid six figures. While that's nothing to write home about compared to lots of other careers or successful businesses, working in cheap countries has allowed me to save most of my salary and invest it.  The flip side of this could be me stuck in some North American city, sitting in traffic every morning, and spending 90% of my salary on basic cost of living expenses.  A decade in, I'm okay with the decision to pursue this career from a financial standpoint. 

    Below are a few screen shots of what pay and benefits look like for Colegio Nueva Granada in Bogota. I'll make another post after this post with a few more schools, because you're only allowed 5 attachments per post. These screen shots come from the job service ISS. 
    Colegio Nueva Granada:
       
       
       
  • Housing- Pretty much all international school either provide you with housing that the school leases for you, or a housing stipend that covers your monthly rent.  Right now, my housing stipend provides enough for me to rent a three-bedroom, two-bath, apartment with a decent sized balcony. 
  • Vacation time- You usually get about 6-7 weeks during the summer, a week off in fall, 4-5 weeks in winter, a week off in spring, then all of the standard holidays from whichever country you're in. 
  • Health insurance- Usually, the country you're working in requires the school to provide you with insurance.  The quality of the insurance varies with the quality of the institution you're working in. 
  • Education for your children- Most schools grant free tuition to 1 or 2 of your children, and then discounted rates to the 3rd, 4th, and so on. Since international schools cater to corporate expats, diplomats, and the country's wealthiest citizens, they are somewhat similar to expensive prep schools.  The quality of education is usually pretty good and your kids are going to rub shoulders with future national leaders.  International schools are a fast track into the Ivies, Cambridges, Oxfords of the world. 
  • Job Security- Even though you'll never be granted tenure, like in American public schools, and some schools can be unstable or quick to fire teachers, you're always going to be able to find a job.  Even though right now (June-August) is the worst time to be looking for an international school job, as all of high paying jobs in the choicest locations have been filled since January, there are still tons of open positions all over the world. If you want to be employed, you're going to find somewhere. Here's what the current homepage of what the TIEOnline job board looks like:
         
    An example position:
       
  • Less red tape and less work- Working in a public school in the western world sucks.  The position has devolved into being much more like being a paper pushing prison guard than an actual teacher.  This is not the case in international schools because they are usually private and don't have to follow all kinds of government bureaucratic BS. Also, class loads tend to be very low.  Think about how many hours per week your university professors taught. International school teachers tend to have class loads more like that.  
  • Good dudes- While in the minority, international schools always have a contingent of dudes who'd be right at home on this forum. I've made some good buddies at each of my stops.  See below in the drawbacks for the opposite of these types of dudes. 
The drawbacks:
  • Opportunity cost- It takes at least getting a 4-year degree, going through a credentialing program, and doing a year of student teaching to get a teaching license.  You might ask yourself if it's worth it to spend the time and money doing that for a career that doesn't pay as well as a Silicon Valley software engineer, petroleum engineer, or even as much as an experienced tradesman. It's a good question to ask yourself.
  • Feminists and the "kids who got picked on in school"- Working in education means you have to interact with people who have very "Current Year Progressive" views on how the world should function. This is generally annoying, and can even lead to you being run out of positions if you express a dissenting opinion. However, another problem arises when these people attempt to apply their world views to the school community of the country they're teaching in. It's like "No, these devoutly Catholic, rich South American parents do not want to sit though a presentation on how the school should provide more opportunities for LGBTQR95#@ teens to express themselves, you fucking idiot!" I get worked up about this type of shit because it's a guilt by association thing.
  • Working under idiots- The same assholes that suggest things like a presentation on homosexuality are often the same assholes who are streamlined into administrative positions in western countries.  While these people tend to flame out in lots of international locations because their world views don't match those of the host country, they can still make your life difficult for a year or two.  My personal solution to this is to go back to the States in a year or two and work on an administrative license so that I can be the administrator and have the power not to hire any of these assholes into my school. 
  • Early start times- You all remember waking up at 6 am to go to school. Teachers have to do that too. If you're a night owl, you might struggle from Monday to Friday. However, there is currently a movement in education to push back start times to 9 am or after.  This movement is spreading. 
There are international schools in pretty much every country on earth, save for a few places like Somalia, Iran (?), and war zones. I even met a guy last year who worked in Kabul International School after the invasion before it was forced to close to bomb threats. I was quietly questioning his sanity while talking to him. 

To get a job in an English-medium international school, you need a teaching license from an English speaking country: USA, UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland, and New Zealand. South Africa is generally not accepted unless you're applying to a local bilingual school in China, rural Thailand, or Cambodia.  Although not the same as international schools, teaching in a local bilingual school can still provide you with good pay and plenty of vacation time. Those types of schools often don't require a teaching license. 

Anyway, I'm going to stop here. This has taken up enough of my morning. Reply or PM for more info.

Additional examples of international school job benefits:

International School of Bangkok-
   
   

Anglo-American School of Sofia-
   
   

Anglo-American School of Moscow-
   

Different types of schools target different types of teachers, and their benefits packages reflect that. The Sofia school is probably targeting teachers with 2 to 4 years of experience, Moscow is probably looking for people in the 6 to 10 year range, and ISB is looking for people with 10+ years in the game.
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#12
(06-08-2019, 12:53 AM)klh Wrote:
(06-08-2019, 12:26 AM)Dash Wrote: Teaching doesn't require local certifications. 

Real Estate doesn't require local knowledge and connections ... in one's home country.

Teaching depends on the country and subject.

There are lots of bad part-time real estate agents.  Obviously, you can't serve clients, close deals, or build a business while travelling.  But it is flexible enough to travel while business is slow, and work extra when business is good.  You must still pay fees to maintain a realtor license while travelling.  High volume agents can negotiate better commission deals.

I was speaking in general. Teaching is absolutely one of the best careers with traveling opportunities. International schools in nearly every foreign country. 

I wasn't talking about real estate agents. Thats not really travel friendly. Landlording and flipping is.
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#13
Thanks for the info Jdreise, great post. I also sent you a pm, but maybe a more general question: what are the working hours/vacations like? How draining is the actual teaching? In my experience it takes a lot of mental energy.
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#14
Theres one relatively easy very travel friendly career move a lot of white collar professionals can make: move to Europe. Every European worker gets anywhere from 6 to 8 weeks of legally guaranteed leave every year. Its possible to do a huge amount of travel with that. I usually do two 2.5 week long haul holidays a year, two or three long weekends around Europe, and use a couple other days on weddings or family events. Northern European middle class jobs also pay well enough that you can take advantage of the long leave to travel extensively, which is key.

I lived and worked in the US a few years ago and while I earned a lot more there the lack of leave was an absolute killer. Its impossible to travel when you only get 10 days (or less) and you have to use a good chunk of them on weddings/family events. Working in Europe is not quite the freedom of teaching English in Asia/South America, but its a lot more stable (and well paid), and you still get to do a good amount of travel. 5 holidays a year really adds up over a decade.

Obviously visas can be a problem depending on your nationality. If you have an Irish or Italian grandparent (like a lot of Americans/commonwealth people do) its relatively easy to claim either citizenship and get an EU passport though. Or, failing that, the next best option is to get a job in a large MNC that has European offices and get an internal transfer. There are also lots of available visas for young people (under 30) to move to Ireland/UK/Spain from the US/Canada/Australia, that would get your foot in the door.
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#15
Travel itself is a huge industry, and fragmented by its very nature, and always will be fragmented, which means easy to start small travel related businesses. So instead of working for someone else in a travel related business, why not start your own? Better yet, combine the big topics of this forum by mixing travel and game, in the broad sense of helping men meet the opposite sex. Maybe additionally combine travel and game with fitness, money making, sexual kung fu, dress and grooming and other forms of self improvement listed in Lifestyle subforums at this and the Armenian/Persian Ayatollah's forum.

Personally, if I were going to start a business (I'm retired and don't need money), it would be related to this long thread at Happier Abroad about the company Dream Connections, which offers $5000 (not including airfare) wife hunting tours to Mykolaiv, Ukraine: http://www.happierabroad.com/forum/viewt...=48&t=9751. Very few guys in these tours actually find an acceptable wife, because of various factors discussed in that thread. But the premise of the company is not bad. There are indeed tons of women in Ukraine who would like to marry an American husband.

My escort girlfriend, for example, has a friend, also an escort, who wants to get out of the business, partly because police are starting to pressure her, partly because she's turned 33 recently and decided she wants to have children soon. Now I know what you're thinking, but let me make my case. First, this friend of my girl is not my type and I never met her, but just from photos and listening to my girl describe her, I can tell what type she is. Namely, the type that if some beta in his 40's provides a nest for her to raise some children, he'll get at least 10 years of as much good sex as he can handle, including regular professional quality blowjobs, a woman who dresses well and otherwise takes care of her appearance and who understands how men's minds work and that most arguments with men can be solved by just giving the man more sex. It's a better deal than most American women are willing to give a guy like that. Anyway, if you don't want to help this young woman out, by profitably connecting her with an American man, someone else will. I already suggested Elenasmodels.com, which is a legitimate online agency.

Loveme.com is another borderline scam agency. My girl was recruited by them to act as a front for letter writing (Boris in the backroom actually writes the letters, her job would be to appear on Skype video every so often, pretend not to speak much English, say thank you for gifts the man sent and maybe say "I love you very much" in English with a heavy slavic accent then blow some kisses) but she considered such scamming beneath her dignity.

Anyway, I would focus on wife hunting tours to Ukraine because that's where I've focused my forum time the last year. Other guys should pick their own areas, based on their interests. As long as it involves both travel and the promise of sex, and is targeted towards sex-starved men from USA, Australia and other rich countries, there is plenty of money to be made.
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#16
(06-07-2019, 08:57 PM)deb_auchery Wrote: It's not difficult to make a decent online income these days. I've been location independent for 12 years. When I first started my business in ecommerce I would do some ad-hoc telemarketing as I had some soul crushing jobs in UK , surprisingly the experience came in use; I would sit in my apartment in Eastern Europe in my underwear making sales calls for a few hours for between $20—25 per hour, boring as hell but if I did a full day I could pay half my rent for the month. Guys in London were doing the same work, paying 30% tax, extortionate rents, and spending any left over money on banging ropey English girls and snorting coke.

A good thing about getting into business is avoiding tax from your own country, register in some tax haven.

It feels good to have been location independent for such a long period of time and be almost bulletproof; travelling the world with just my laptop and know how.

The biggest challenge these days is not becoming too comfortable and pushing myself.

Now I'm becoming older, I'm looking for more meaning in life, and some tangible achievements. When you get to you forties, it's now or never.

I'm actually in the process of starting a ecommerce business.I'm thinking of starting something small to gain some income to reinvest in another ecommerce store and other side hustles.The thing that will be a concern when I start thinking about growing is the tax issue.I was originally thinking of registering as a business in the country I'm in(U.S.)  but I would eventually want to move the come which I think would be a big headache financially.I'm interested in the idea of registering in a tax haven in the future.If you have any information you can pass on I would appreciate it.

@KLH

What are some skills and hobbies that you have.That may be a good place to start from.
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#17
(06-08-2019, 01:50 PM)churros Wrote: Thanks for the info Jdreise, great post. I also sent you a pm, but maybe a more general question: what are the working hours/vacations like? How draining is the actual teaching? In my experience it takes a lot of mental energy.

Working hours depend on the school, but generally, the work day starts some time around 7:15 to 8:00 am and ends around 3:30 to 4:30 pm. There are a couple of break periods in the day and an hour or so lunch. My current school is in a culture where they take two hours at lunch to eat then get a nap. I do the same or go to the gym during that time.  Depending on the school, you might have an extra duty during one of the break periods or lunch, like being a hall monitor.  My last school had that, my current one does not.  

I mentioned vacations in my first post.  Depending on the school, you'll also get anywhere from 2 to 10 paid or unpaid personal days.  I currently have 5 paid personal days. That's an additional vacation right there. You also get bereavement leave in case a loved one dies. I've had to take this before. 

The classroom experience depends completely upon the situation. At some schools you'll be asked to teach only one subject for one grade level for the equivalent of 15 to 20 50-minute periods per week. This is easy because you only have one lesson to prepare, which you repeat for each period. By the third time giving that lesson, you're automatic. By extension, some schools might ask for 25 periods per week, or 5 per day, which I think is still acceptable. Exploitative schools might try to push you to as high as 30.  Tell them to stick it up their ass. No one who takes a teaching job abroad does it to spend 11 hours a day at work. I show up a couple minutes before I am contractually required, and leave as soon as I'm contractually permitted.      

Other schools may ask you teach two or three subjects or grade levels.   This makes your lesson prep time increase greatly.  Let's say you're a science teacher. The school may have contracted you to teach 3 courses:  9th grade Biology, 10th grade Chemistry, and 11th grade AP Environmental Science. This means the school probably has another science teacher teaching 10th grade AP Chemistry, 11th grade AP Physics, and 12th grade AP Physics Mechanics.  Having to prepare 3 courses each week can be time consuming, but once you've done it for a year or two, you have all of the materials set and can just roll out the same content year after year (with slight tweaking). 

In smaller or less financially well-off schools, they might even try to get a teacher to teach all four courses in a high school subject area.  Using the above example, that would look like: 9th grade Biology, 10th grade Chemistry, 11th grade AP Environmental Science, and 12th grade AP Physics.  Anyone who has been teaching long enough knows to turn down this kind offer immediately. The school is looking for someone to use and abuse. I wouldn't consider any more than 3 courses.  One or two courses is ideal. 

As for help in prepping lessons and units, you can find tons of free stuff online, schools will often give you the curriculum in the form of the textbook and all of its digital supplementary materials (handouts and worksheets), and you can get entire prepared units from TeachersPayTeachers.com for a few bucks a pop. This will save you tons of time.  

To finish, even though what I described above might seem a little intimidating, the hardest part about teaching is getting through the first year. Once you understand how to plan lessons, and compile some resources to throw at the students, it becomes automatic.  I probably only spend about three or four hours a week preparing lesson materials and grading assignments. I usually try to have the kids check each other's work to cut down on the time I have to spend grading. I've been on cruise control for the last few years. 
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#18
Not sure if this is mentioned elsewhere in the forums.
But where is a good recoommended place to
get a TEFL or CELTA or TESOL?
Is it better and cheaper to do it online?
Or is it recommended to do it in person?
Looking at some courses in Italy or Greece, Prague, POland as well.
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#19
@OP 
I talked to a fight attendant a while ago and they don't pay bad if you've been with the company for years. Aside from that it's unionized and depending if we see a recession (not sure if being a flight attendant is recession proof) it might not be be a bad career for younger guys. The flight attendant told me it's flexible and you work as many hours as you want. If I really needed the money I would work as a flight attendant while juggling a side biz or school. 

With oil some companies move you around. I've worked with people that had gigs in Hawaii. At the risk of being wrong usually your shifts will be either in the middle of nowhere or you will be working 60+ hours per week and you won't have time to fuck around. Plenty of my coworkers complained about the crappy hotels they stayed at. 

I suggest looking into Victor Pride, BlackDragon, and other "manosphere" type writers. Warrior Forum and Millionnaire Fastlane are pretty good too.
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#20
I worked in international schools for many years in Latin America and Asia. It was incredible in so many ways, and I wouldn't trade the experience for anything.

However, nearing 40, I felt the pull for something else. So I moved back to the U.S, knowing full well my serious gaming days were done. I am in the upper midwest, and the talent pool is basically nil. 80% of girls over 25 are overweight, and of the 20% who aren't fat, maybe a handful are worth looking at. Of those, almost all are married and those that aren't are raging bitches.  It is so bad up here that most women snarl at you even if you say hi.  They think it is "creepy."

College girls are completely out of the question even for a fit, attractive and decently moneyed man. Sure there is probably an outlier somewhere, but it is not worth digging in that haystack.

Instead, I came home because the things I like to do (hunting, fishing, cycling, hiking, rebilding motorcycles, breathing clean air) are much harder to do in most places overseas. Of course I miss all the allures, but I prefer now to take a few trips a year and have a stable homebase. I really went overboard in my years abroad, and I prefer a little calm now. However, I know someday I will probably feel that itch to live abroad again. It will probably be the philippines or maybe Mexico or Colombia.
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