If you were in College again, what would you do?
#1
Hello guys

I'll skip to the chase. If you were in college all over, with what you know now about life, how would you do?
in regards of:
Girls
Networking
Major
Even if you would skip it or not.
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#2
No girlfriends Christoff, none. No matter how hot or how good the sex. It does not matter if she can lick the chrome off of a trailer hitch or suck a golf ball through a garden hose. None.

Focus on developing yourself 100%. Having sex with women in college, going out with them, having fun with them is part of that experience; you need to gain significant first-hand experience on the nature and methods of women, how to approach them and internalize that they are abundant. Not settling (even as a girlfriend) with one girl at this age will continue to build a rock solid frame as you determine what you like, what you do not like and particularly not tolerating any crap from a women…none. You must learn to walk away.

You need to see how women are similar around the world (it will open your eyes) and how they are different. This second part will help you make better decisions. You can have sex with them again, but no girlfriends. They are close to their peak in their early 20´s and know this unconsciously. You are not and will not be at your peak for another 15 to 20 years on average. Your ignorance is to their advantage and they exploit this as it is part of their hardwired biology. You can easily have twenty something girlfriends again when you are in your late 30´s; even in your 40´s and 50´s, but more recent social programing says this is bad and tries to shame you. You may internalize this shame and it could show up later in life as a rock around your neck and find you do not have the confidence to pull these young, beautiful sexy creatures. Do not let it happen. Understand the feminine imperative.

If you are in the U.S. or any western country (or any country for that matter), always use birth control, do not trust her, trust yourself. The person who has your best self-interest at heart is YOU. You could have legal and financial responsibilities that trap you for 18 years that could severely sidetrack your life or prevent you fulfilling your purpose or accomplishing your goals or simply being happy. This does not mean that you cannot choose this trap in 15-20 years, but your point of reference will be different. A man not fulfilling his purpose in life is like a lion that once hunted and roamed the plains who is now living in a cage. By the way this is not knocking fathers in any way, much respect to them as we all have or had them and those of us with good fathers and grandfathers understand the difference that they make, especially if they have/had a solid frame that you experienced daily in their example.

Keep this focus until you are fulfilling your purpose in life. Most guys do not realize that their value increases with age. When you are doing what you want to do in life and have a greater sense of who you are, what you are about and how you are getting to your (interim) destination, then consider a girlfriend. When you are fulfilling your purpose and accomplishing your mission, you know it. If you do not know it, then you are not there. Sally forth until you are.

The women will be flocking to you when you are in this groove. This is recommend for guys under 25; even if you think you have it made with your first 6 figure job, or believe you have the women eating out of your hand because you have had sex with 20 girls. You have no idea where you will be in the following 15 years.

If you have strong self-efficacy and a good internal locus of control you will see. If you do not, then developing these two things should be a priority.
Get busy living or get busy dying!
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#3
Really nice post P.T.

I fall into the category of not being a huge believer in university. It's mostly because everything I do, or have interest in doing, you don't need a traditional degree for. I'm making most of my money to live the life I am living now online. I sometimes go back and work in oil (guys working in oil for a few years can make half a million dollars a year if they choose the right field). Then, there are IT sectors that i'm interested in but you can do really hardcore courses for 3 months and get a job in IT. I just feel like it's kind of a rip off. Wish I would have taken my time in college and started traveling sooner. Or used all that hard work studying on making my own business (you can learn better, not ancient info, on business in books).

But the girl and party aspect of universities in USA ar ereally unique and could be something you dont want to miss out on. So if you do go, just make sure to do all you can to get the college experience and dont worry too much about "your reputation"
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#4
P.T. your post is dead on what to do with the girls,

Get a job work your ass off and leave there debt free or close to debt free as you can. Don't have debt hanging over you. Oh and don't do intern work unless it is paid, don't ever work for free. You want to volunteer for some club or social deal that is fine, get the one position that pays. Want to party go for it, just figure out way to make money off it.

Looking back at my schooling 25 years later there was so many opportunities that I passed up to make money, almost make me sad. Girlfriends cost to much and because I had one, missed out on so many girls. Partying cost way to much and if you passed out you, you don't get laid (or if you did you wont remember it)

As far as majors go, what is repeated all the time, stick to hard sciences or go the finance route. If you want to be artist/writer/etc. you don't need to major in that in school to be awesome at it. IMO those that do go to school for artsy fartsy shit end up sucking at.

My Grandfather had it right learn a trade, you will always have food on you plate and roof over your head and be able to provide for a family. My trade has made me more money than all the schooling I have had.

University of life is one of the best educations any man can have.
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#5
(02-24-2017, 07:24 PM)BarbarianFather Wrote: P.T. your post is dead on what to do with the girls,

Get a job work your ass off and leave there debt free or close to debt free as you can. Don't have debt hanging over you. Oh and don't do intern work unless it is paid, don't ever work for free. You want to volunteer for some club or social deal that is fine, get the one position that pays. Want to party go for it, just  figure out way to make money off it.

Looking back at my schooling 25 years later there was so many opportunities that I passed up to make money, almost make me sad. Girlfriends cost to much and because I had one, missed out on so many girls. Partying cost way to much and if you passed out you, you don't get laid (or if you did you wont remember it)

As far as majors go, what is repeated all the time, stick to hard sciences or go the finance route. If you want to be artist/writer/etc. you don't need to major in that in school to be awesome at it. IMO those that do go to school for artsy fartsy shit end up sucking at.

My Grandfather had it right learn a trade, you will always have food on you plate and roof over your head and be able to provide for a family. My trade has made me more money than all the schooling I have had.

University of life is one of the best educations any man can have.

5 x 5 BarbarianFather.

Wanted to keep it focused on girls and drive home a point.  A good course correction early on can makes a huge difference over the span of a life time in terms of getting to a good destination.  This has messed more people up than most things. 

The world is different now and having a trade is solid advice.  For those with heavy societal programming, consider a combination like a degree in (mechanical) engineering and being some type of mechanic.  Skills and services that are complimentary, and are always in need.  As you said, ¨you will always have food on you plate and roof over your head.¨ 

The P.T. recommendation is Robotics. This is work that can be done in multiple countries so you can travel and adventure while you work. It is going to change the face of the world 10 times what the internet did.  Many jobs are going to vanish as well.
Get busy living or get busy dying!
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#6
Bumping this thread because I'm finishing high school this year and unsure what to do.

I aspire the international lifestyle that this forum advocates and would really like traveling in the future. But I would not mind living (somewhat permanently) in an EE country like Romania or Poland either.

As I understand, for this kind of lifestyle college/uni is often not the most efficient path as many end up working soul sucking 9 to 5 jobs without any mobility. 
Getting some kind of online income would be better because freedom is way more valuable. 

I'm from Germany however, where university is free/really cheap. So for me it would seem stupid to not get a degree, right? Or is that kind of thinking limiting me? 
I've been trying a few things online recently like ecommerce/affiliate marketing  without too much luck yet, obviously these things require time to research which I will probably not have in university. In Germany it's the norm to get a masters degree as well so I'll be around 23/24 when I finish. That's obviously not too old but it's also not young. 

Alternatively I can get into trade school. Wages here are a lot less than the US though, truck drivers making 70k+ dollars are unheard of here. Even relative to the costs of living. 
This will leave me with more time to get a better grasp on online income/business while still having some kind of income. This option seems the most risky.

After some research my current choice is a computer science degree, with a minor in artificial intelligence. This will offer more benefits than other STEM degrees like engineering.
-Possibility to get placed over to a company in EE if I join a multinational tech company here. This means I can work in English while learning the local language in my free time, getting a good salary relative to the local income/living expenses.
-Stable job/degree with good pay in my home country (but not quite as good as in US). 
-A lot of freelance work is also IT based which means that's also an option, although I'll probably be overqualified for most jobs, in certain countries living is so cheap it won't really matter. 

-On the flipside I won't have much free time in university and also after that. It seems like CS jobs are quite tiring mentally and physically (sitting so long). This means even if I live in the country I want and am working there it might still not be what I expected it to be.

There will also be max 5% girls in my class since it's CS. 
I plan to work around this with a bit of good time management and joining social clubs/hobbies with good ratios. Is this realistic?
Obviously uni is also a place where you develop yourself socially and not getting much valuable experience with girls will have negative effects. 

As an alternative I might see myself doing something like pharmacy school, less stressful than med school after uni (especially in europe) while still getting a stable and quite prestigious career. CS has zero prestige and is sometimes even seen as negative by the 'nerdy' image of it.
But it will also offer less mobility because in social interaction with patients you usually have to speak the countries native language fluently to work there.
There will also be way way more girls in the medical parts of uni so even if the workload of the degree is about the same I'll have more opportunities girls wise.
Obviously you shouldn't choose your major based on the amount of girls studying it but I'm still really young so it's on my mind a lot. 

What would you guys do if you were in my position? Computer Science? Pharmacy school? Trade school? Something else?
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#7
If you do go the university route, shouldn't it be possible for you to study elsewhere in Europe for free or cheap, like Poland?

I know a few folks - some from even outside the EU - who study here in Poland, for cheap but quality EU degrees.

Polish girls would be a step up from German ones too.

Plus once in Poland it'll be easier to network and get a job in Poland, perhaps with a multinational.

Salary in Poland would be less than that in Germany though. Almost every choice has a trade-off.

As for what to major in, if you want an international lifestyle, CS seems the way to go, though that's only what I've read, not experienced.
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#8
In terms of the "get an education" "college gets you a job" thing, college is a 100% scam unless you learn something useful like programming that also gets you a (decent paying) job. However, starting a biz or otherwise working for oneself is not for everyone - has its own ups and downs as well as challenges. I would try getting some sort of admin job at an office or internship to see how you feel about corporate life. Personally, I hate it so much that I want to do some "online business" thing - I'm not a natural born hustler or anything

If you end up going, for girls:

Join the coolest frat possible (lots of hot girls, lots of parties) and not some pothead frat with "chill people". Unless you go to a school with 0 Greek life, college socializing (and sex) revolves around social circle/Greek life
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#9
(10-13-2017, 05:45 PM)whiteknightrises Wrote: Join the coolest frat possible (lots of hot girls, lots of parties) and not some pothead frat with "chill people". Unless you go to a school with 0 Greek life, college socializing (and sex) revolves around social circle/Greek life

Frats are not a big thing in Europe. University is completely different here compared to the US. I feel like in Europe it is much less about partying and banging chicks during college. That is probably due to the fact that the majority of students don't even live on campus. Most of them are just living in a small flat with 2-3 other people somewhere in the city. Big student dorms with monthly or quarterly dorm parties are available, but it's kind of low status to live in a student dorm.
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#10
I've thought about going to university in Poland, there are some good degrees in Poland that are valuable in EU but those are mostly for people fluent in Polish.
English degrees in for example Computer Science might be just as difficult but they're unknown to anyone in for example west Europe, and even have a kinda bad rep here because people still think Poland is a poor shithole country. I want to keep the option of working here as well, and if I somehow ever want to end up working in the anglosphere it'll be a lot easier with a German degree. I doubt it with everything I've read about the anglosphere but it does pay better.
I'll probably do a semester abroad though.

There are frats here as well, but the general population looks down on those, mainly because of the rushing. Having to prove yourself through mental and physical torture just to be able to get approval from a disclosed group, and then feeling better than people that don't join is seen as weak. I don't think it's quite like Greek life but I guess frats are looked down upon by a lot of people in the US as well. I'll probably join some kind of student drama club or volleyball club which have a lot of girls, and fun activities as well.

I don't think I'll hate corporate life so much that I want to 100% focus on an online business because there are more risks involved. Especially if I can work in EE countries. Work/play balance in Europe seems to be a lot better than the US, with less stressful hours and more vacation. In that case a CS degree seems like my best bet. I don't really enjoy programming though. Just neutral. I don't really 'enjoy' any science subjects to be honest. I'm good at maths and logic and quite dedicated however so getting through it shouldn't be a problem.
Is this normal or will I just set myself up for depression in the long run?
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#11
Read this: https://mavericktraveler.com/6-reasons-w...ogrammers/

My recommendation for you: find out first what you really want to do. Spend a year doing internships, traveling a bit (do you even like it in EE?), maybe try to learn programming by yourself to see if you can enjoy it, keep pursuing your online business ideas, talk with people who are older and more experienced than you. Then after one year you can still enroll at a university (in Germany, not some Ostblockland). What I wanted from life when I started university and what I want now is completely different. I think it has changed twice in the last 3 years. Had I focused 3 years ago on the things I want now, I would be much further in life now.
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#12
Maverick Traveler's articles are great, including the one above, but keep in mind that with each article, he's selling "how to start an online business" consulting and such.

For the semester abroad, maybe Erasmus - which everyone calls "Orgasmus" - would also be an option.

Whatever you do, don't mentally masturbate too long. On the Internet, you'll get advice that's all over the place, ranging from the boring route, to the "follow your dreams and the money will follow" route.

Approaching life is like approaching girls. Get some advice from guys who actually have what you want, but keep in mind that you're still going to fail a lot until you figure it out. The worst thing to do in that case would be to fail slowly.

Talking about it seems productive, and it feels great to get some attention, but your best bet would be to let this thread die, pick what seems best now (flip a coin or roll dice if you can't decide), and most importantly,

Get to work - now.
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#13
(10-14-2017, 10:40 AM)262 Wrote: Maverick Traveler's articles are great, including the one above, but keep in mind that with each article, he's selling "how to start an online business" consulting and such.

The article I linked to is a very old one. I think it even was one of the first on his blog. I doubt that he wrote the article with the idea in the back of his mind to sell people an online business course. Back then he didn't even have his first book published.
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#14
As a guy who is going into programming I see some of these things. When i meet other developers, I see serious social issues. I wonder if they became this way after working in this field a while or if they started out this way. I hope its the latter. I also feel my social skills slipping slightly, but i imagine its just a temporary thing before i get back out into the world.
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#15
I believe you lose social skill the longer your part of IT, specially if you move up into programming or back in maintenance where you talk to less and less people. I have watched a good friend of mine slowly sink into, lack of better term, his shell. Use to be a very social person. The last few months I of have made mention of this, he is trying to counter act the decline. Problem now is the social anxiety he dealing with. Coming up on 20 years in IT. Now if you take a socially awkward person to begin with they may decline even faster.

Just my 2c of thoughts.
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#16
Yeah that kind of stuff freaks me out a bit. I have to be careful. The amount of awkward people in coding is astounding. 20Nation can't ever be like that.
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#17
20 I think you will be good for simple fact of you have had sex, with more than you hand or fattie or two.
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#18
University did me a world of good. I didn't do much for career opportunities, but it exposed me to a lot of material that I wouldn't have probably otherwise encountered at that age.

Changed my life for the better.

But I didn't limit myself to simply going to class. It was something I plunked away at a little at a time while take long breaks to pursue other types of learning. My post-secondary educational phase was nearly ten years long and included doing an extra high school semester in Japan, doing a four year undergraduate degree in the US, spending three years in China doing a combination of study/work and getting a very good start on learning the language.

I also took some jobs in my Canadian homeland, which taught me that a lot of great, smart hardworking people work for little more than minimum wage and served as a motivation to do something more rewarding with my life.

I've cut my own path since finishing the official educational phase of my life, but of course I'm learning as much now as I did then. No regrets about obtaining a traditional education, but I'm glad I put a lot of time into learning experiences as well.

It took me till about 30 to chill out enough to be ready to pursue something seriously, so there's very little I could have done with my twenties that would have been a much better use of my time.

As far as the degree goes, as I phase more and more into consulting work, it's going to be something very useful in getting my foot in the door at potential clients.
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#19
(10-16-2017, 04:53 AM)20Nation Wrote: As a guy who is going into programming I see some of these things. When i meet other developers, I see serious social issues. I wonder if they became this way after working in this field a while or if they started out this way.

They start out that way. Something about "the machine is easier to relate to than other people" -- there's a reason we associate "computer club" kids and gamers with late/perpetual virginity. And be honest, you mean "borderline Aspergers at best". I remember back at university one of them screeching out loud in the local coffee shop about "NO NO NO NO 100 TIMES NO YOU WOULD NOT USE THAT TRANSFER PROTOCOL TO DO THAT" to one of his classmates, and the coffee girl glancing at him (accurately) like he was a mental case.

(10-19-2017, 10:46 AM)Suits Wrote: But I didn't limit myself to simply going to class. It was something I plunked away at a little at a time while take long breaks to pursue other types of learning. My post-secondary educational phase was nearly ten years long and included doing an extra high school semester in Japan, doing a four year undergraduate degree in the US, spending three years in China doing a combination of study/work and getting a very good start on learning the language.

To answer the thread title: this^. Deviation from the base schooling framework; going beyond it. Especially things like exchange. Exchange is the Number 1 thing I'd have done differently if I were in the shoes of my younger self. 

The issue is that the core philosophy of schooling goes against this: being given instructions, artificial achievements ("grades"), fixed terms, fixed locations, fixed groups of people, and so on. It is anathema to initiative. People succeed by taking initiative in spite of the system.
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#20
Like this topic. Really wish I could go back to when I was starting college.

What I would do with what I know now.

1) Go to community college for 1-2 years and bust out all my basic shit. Do it as fast as possible ie summer school

2) If parents will pay finish my last 2 years at a school away from home. If parents wont pay then go to a local Uni and save the coin.

3) If I was confident I could pass the courses id major in Engineering. If I wasnt I would major in Accounting.

4) While in Uni start focusing on game and self improvement (style, confidence, fitness, learn Spanish, Latin Dancing etc)

5) Undecided on if joining a frat would be worth it.

6) Do a Spring Break Trip to Cancun with your best mates (or somewhere in Latin America)

7) Do a study abroad program. (this is really my main regret from University, fuck me couldn't imagine doing a semester in Brazil or Colombia)

8) After graduation, if I majored in Engineering, I would look to get a good paying (or saving) job that was like 3 months on 3 months off, or anything that allowed me save money and have plenty of time to travel.

After graduation, if I majored in accounting, I would do an intensive well regarded coding program in what ever the most reliable promising field in IT was. After that I would go teach English in South Korea, save a grand a month and work on making money on the side coding. After contract was over go travel SEA.

Depending on how coding was coming along, if I wasn't making enough yet to make it full time location independent, I go back to South Korea for one more year and knock out an alternative teaching program in high school math.

After that the world is my oyster with fall back plans and safe nets with the ability to work anywhere in the world and make money from my computer full time or as a side hustle.
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