The Lifting/Fitness thread
#1
Alrite fellas, let's talk lifts.

My current routing is a 3-day full body workout and 2 days of cardio on my non-lifting days. I've gotten impressive results and will post before and after pics as soon as I get a chance.

Height - 6'3
Weight - 165

My current stats are:

Squat: 160 - 8 reps
Bench - 155 - 8 reps
DL - 165 - 10 reps

These numbers may look tiny but keep in mind I was a scrawny dude with no strength just a few months ago haha. I'm loving the progress I'm making though. I'm also doing 2 scoops a day of ON protein powder. 

Post your numbers, advice, routines, nutrition, whatever. Doesn't have to be lifting-related.
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#2
The book I used when I started lifting for aesthetics was "Scrawny to Brawny."

Half the book is about lifting, and the other half is about nutrition. So it was great when I was a beginner.
If you haven't met anyone, I'll assume you're lying (h/t to Teedub from the old forum)
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#3
I don't know how old you are but one thing I would recommend is to warm up before your workout and incorporate some stretching, it gets more important the older you get and it can avoid injuries.
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#4
(04-21-2021, 08:39 PM)Lino Wrote: I don't know how old you are but one thing I would recommend is to warm up before your workout and incorporate some stretching, it gets more important the older you get and it can avoid injuries.

Yep. Good advice. I used to skip this step until a got a glute strain. 

Now I do at least 10 minutes of stretching/warmup.
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#5
Typing on my phone so likely to be esl spec grammar

I love staying fit, it's a hobby that pays off in so many different ways. Been jogging, swimming, hiking and lifting casually since my early 20s. Fairweather surfer and beginner snowboarder. I did BJJ for a while but it gave me constant nagging pains, which really put me off.

I'm not a big jacked bloke but I'm in my mid 30s, wiry strong and more energetic than I was at 21. Nothing satisfies me as much as strenuous physical activity.

I've been doing a lot of running lately to try get to a point where I could do a half marathon. I've been doing three runs a week, 2 short ones during the week and a longer one on the weekend. At the moment this looks like 2x 5km and 1x 10km. Sometimes one of each if life gets in the way. Sometimes like this week, I'll change it up and do a jump rope session to keep things fresh.

I have a love hate relationship with strength training. I love being strong enough to do anything I need to do in life, but I hate commercial gyms and the powerlifting obsession of the fitness community. Imo you can be 'strong enough' with 6 months of dedicated lifting, after this point if you dont have a good coach the risks become considerable.

Recently started 531 again (imo the best available strength plan) but quickly found all the fuss is just not for me anymore, so I've purchased a few 20kg bags of sand + a few 10kg and 5kg bags of gravel and will probably give em a whirl tonight. I've read sandbags feel way heavier than they should but may consider unilateral leg exercises given the low weights. Either that or very high reps.

What I want out of my strength training: enjoyment, to stay strong and healthy til I'm old, carryover to other physical activity. Being refreshed and 'ready' rather than spent. I also prefer to look at it as play, when routines and diet plans get too detailed it's just a chore that starts to feel like a second job.
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#6
Good idea for a thread. The weightlifting thread on RVF was great for years.

Weightlifting completely changed my life. When I was 18 I was a skinny wreck, I weighed 140lb/63kg at 6ft0. I got no girls. I'd be out in bars/at parties at least twice a week and could easily go a month or more without even kissing a girl, nevermind getting laid. In an extremely easy, heavy drinking, college environment. I hands down did the worst with girls of any guy in either my school or college friend groups. Luckily, in my first year at uni, I started playing rugby. And as a side effect started lifting weights a lot, because I was told I had to put on significant weight to avoid getting injured.

Once I reached a 'normal' weight of around 175lb/80KG (about 2ish years later) I no longer found things an uphill battle on nights out - I never had to fight to overcome that bias against skinniness from girls. Once I hit about 200lbs/90KG (about 5 years after starting) at around 24 things changed massively. It was now sometimes actually a downhill battle - drunk girls would frequently enough open me if I was wearing a fitted tshirt on nights out suddenly. Going to any sort of party I could be topless at (pool parties etc) was (and still is, hopefully, post-corona) ridiculously fun.

And nothing else changed - only my body. My completely average face, hair, height, style of clothes etc were all pretty much identical to when I was 18. Its absolutely shocking how the world reacts differently to you if you're 50lb~ heavier. It shouldn't, and it shows how superficial people (both men and women) are, but it does.

I've known quite a few guys from rugby over the years too who all went through a similar life changing experience, it seems to be quite common. I've yet to meet anyone whos gotten into great shape who hasn't said its life changing - the only people I've ever heard question the benefits of it are the ones who haven't actually experienced it.

Starting a weightlifting routine is the #1 advice I give to anyone whos newly single, or whos struggling with women, whos depressed or bored, or even just whos a younger guy. There are few things in life that can match the benefit to you of doing 3-5 hours a week of weightlifting for that little time investment.
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#7
I noticed that in the US there’s an emphasis on “getting big” like a football player. I guess this is because football and baseball are the country’s biggest sports and those guys tend to be heavier than say - soccer players.

I lift to maintain an overall level of fitness but have no intention of putting on more weight, if I can avoid it.
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#8
Not only do get more attention from girls but you get more respect from other guys, if you're a twig a lot of guys will disrespect you. You don't have to be huge, just athletic looking.
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#9
Yeah being big is definitely in fashion. I will never have that build no matter how much I lift, and personally I prefer the aesthetic of muscular, slim, and flexible. That works better in asia.

I also have questions about how much work it takes to maintain that build. It's a zero sum game and I'm simply not willing to compromise my health with steroids / creatine and time with meal planning etc. That's a viable game model for some guys, but not for me.

Kind of weird to think women will actually mate with males depending on whatever is in fashion. That's the extent to which they're social creatures.

(04-22-2021, 08:45 PM)SC87 Wrote: Not only do get more attention from girls but you get more respect from other guys, if you're a twig a lot of guys will disrespect you. You don't have to be huge, just athletic looking.

Yep you will get "tested" more if you don't intimidate people with your size. Just have to be doubly aggressive with your response when that happens...
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#10
@TigerMandingo To be fair its not just in the US, its the same in lots of places. Australia is where I've experienced the highest average standard for men being jacked, much much more-so than anywhere in the US.

My pop psychology take is its anywhere where the most popular high school sport requires size. So in the US its American football, but in Australia/NZ/UK/Ireland/some parts of France and South Africa its rugby. Guys who fit the mould of the American football star, or the captain of the rugby team, are the ones everyone looks up to/tries to emulate/wants to date. And that then bleeds into society at large.

Its not as idealized in other countries but I've yet to be anywhere where being big was a disadvantage. I don't doubt that it happens though - I'd guess once you move from strong field athlete to proper bodybuilder, juiced, size that it would be a negative for a lot of women (and in general in life as well - much more hours required, health damage from the steroids if abused, practical problems with airline seats etc).

=
@churros Guys often make the mistake of assuming it requires a huge amount of weekly work, when its actually more about consistency week-to-week and year-to-year. If you do three 1 hour sessions a week lifting weights, consistently, for 3 years+, you'll be in the top tier of guys almost anywhere. And all the meal planning etc is only required if you're trying to get your bodyfat % very low, or else actually competing in bodybuilding. Otherwise its just eating a vaguely healthy high protein diet, the same as every guy should be doing anyway.
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#11
I'm fit but not jacked (ask the guys who've met me).

Took a few months nearly a decade ago of a structured program of consistently lifting AND meal planning to achieve it (thanks to the "Scrawny to Brawny" book).

Most skinny guys, like I was, benefit from meal planning. They simply normally don't eat enough calories.

Is the top tier achievable without more than what I've done? Depends on how you define top tier, and what your genetics are.
If you haven't met anyone, I'll assume you're lying (h/t to Teedub from the old forum)
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#12
(04-22-2021, 10:17 PM)churros Wrote: Yeah being big is definitely in fashion. I will never have that build no matter how much I lift, and personally I prefer the aesthetic of muscular, slim, and flexible. That works better in asia.

I also have questions about how much work it takes to maintain that build. It's a zero sum game and I'm simply not willing to compromise my health with steroids / creatine and time with meal planning etc. That's a viable game model for some guys, but not for me.

Kind of weird to think women will actually mate with males depending on whatever is in fashion. That's the extent to which they're social creatures.

(04-22-2021, 08:45 PM)SC87 Wrote: Not only do get more attention from girls but you get more respect from other guys, if you're a twig a lot of guys will disrespect you. You don't have to be huge, just athletic looking.

Yep you will get "tested" more if you don't intimidate people with your size. Just have to be doubly aggressive with your response when that happens...

Churros,
as someone with, I'm assuming the same build as you based on your description here, I'll have to agree. Unless youre genetically gifted or put in the work from a younger age, I  definitely think the slim/fit/athletic look is the way to go, especially for a place like asia. Getting big and jacked isn't really an option for me and would do more harm than good trying to get there, I work everyday towards staying athletic in a healthy way however and thats much more valuable to me and still will return dividends vs not working out at all. 

Always anecdotal of course but one of my best friends that is an absolute natty beast asian guy, dedicated to a T, is starting to feel the wear and tear of heavy lifting for 15+ years now. I can't say its due to things like bad form either, he has his form down to a T, just simply has pushed things too far or has gotten wear and year of the years to where he has to tone things down, but thanks to his dedication hes still pretty damn jacked. Then on the other hand people juice or lift natty perfectly fine for way longer than him, and viceaversa. 

For myself athletic/fit is the balance between not working out at all vs going too hard in the gym. Perfect zen.
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#13
(04-25-2021, 03:35 PM)AirWaves Wrote: I'm fit but not jacked (ask the guys who've met me).

Took a few months nearly a decade ago of a structured program of consistently lifting AND meal planning to achieve it (thanks to the "Scrawny to Brawny" book).

Most skinny guys, like I was, benefit from meal planning. They simply normally don't eat enough calories.

Is the top tier achievable without more than what I've done? Depends on how you define top tier, and what your genetics are.

You definitely need to go to the conscious effort of eating way more if you're naturally skinny and trying to put on weight, but thats comparatively easy on time consumption. I'd assume that wasn't what churros was referring to by time consuming meal planning - meal planning to me anyway would mean the guys counting their macros and calories exactly, timing their meals obsessively etc. Which an amateur just doesn't need to do unless they're trying to cut to very low bf%.

Top tier to me would be top 5-10% of men in a given region. Which if you're past college age really isn't that hard most places (outside of a select few hyper competitive environments like Sydney/Ibiza/South Florida/Floripa etc). Most men from their early 20s on just get into progressively worse and worse shape every year. By late 20s or older very very few have both decent muscle mass and sub 20% bodyfat.

Don't get me wrong to look like an instagram model absolutely requires years of complete dedication (and steroids/clenbuterol). But if someone just wants to be healthy, strong, and noticeably more muscular than average in a bar then a few hours a week lifting weights, and a slightly healthy diet, over the years is enough to achieve a huge amount. It seems daunting at first if you're not naturally sporty but its really just all about getting out there and starting a routine, then keeping to it consistently. If dumb as a brick teenage athletes can do it then anyone here self-aware enough to be actively engaging in game development/self-improvement definitely can.
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#14
When you are 30+ it doesn't take too much to be in the top 10 or 15% body wise. Social media and things like that skew reality, walk around the streets or the mall and it's not often that you see guys that are impressive body wise. The only time where you really see a concentration of guys with good bodies would be at the gym or some beaches, but in reality most of the guys at the beach are just kind of thin or have a "dad bod."
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#15
5x5 squat 120 kg
5x5 bench 100 kg
Deadlift max 1x5 170 kg
Weight 80 kg
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