Itching to leave parents basement
#1
Does/has anyone else had this feeling? Im almost done with school and am itching to move out of my oversheltered/overbearing house and experience women/drinking/etc. Every week is a slow grind.
Reply
#2
How old are you and where do you live?
Reply
#3
Whats stopping you from doing so right now? Get a job, get a room mate, and get living. The only person keeping you in the basement is yourself.
Reply
#4
Finish school, join gym, find a part time job, move out, learn to cook
Reply
#5
Move out ASAP. When I was younger all my friends moved out after high school. We got part time jobs, went to school. We lived together in apartments. That's what everyone did. We took jobs like waiters or busboys and worked our way up. It was a fun and important part of my life.

I see a lot of kids still living with their parents after high school and I'd say get out of the house as fast as you can. The sooner you start the better. We all started this way before.

I have a 6 figure business. I travel for 2 months a year. Staying at home I would have had a harder time in life. And it would have taken me longer to succeed.

I don't say this to brag. But I think young kids get the wrong information that taking part time jobs and living with friends in an apartments is a bad thing. That it means you are poor or won't make it or something. But it is the opposite. It's fun and you grow up quick doing it.

The sooner you move out of the house the better. Parents will still treat you as children when you are in their house. They don't mean to but that is all they know. When you leave the house they start to look at you a bit different. As you are not in the house and on your own. That's a good thing.
Reply
#6
(12-14-2020, 09:12 AM)terrific Wrote: Does/has anyone else had this feeling? Im almost done with school and am itching to move out of my oversheltered/overbearing house and experience women/drinking/etc. Every week is a slow grind.

I was in your position during my college years due to a number of variables, some I could control and some I could not.  I had a few different plans to get out on my own during that time but they always ended up getting derailed.  

If you're almost done with school you should hopefully be getting a plan together if you haven't already.  My best advice is to also have a plan b and even a plan c in case things get wonky.  2020 is a rough year and the circumstances don't make it any easier to kick off a career and make your own way, but it can be done.  I launched out on my own during the Great Recession in an industry that had been decimated during that time.  Be persistent and you can make it happen!
Reply
#7
(12-14-2020, 09:12 AM)terrific Wrote: Does/has anyone else had this feeling? Im almost done with school and am itching to move out of my oversheltered/overbearing house and experience women/drinking/etc. Every week is a slow grind.

Yes I had this feeling when I was like 16 and the only correct solution was to move out asap once I was done with school. Just do it. Really the best you can do.

No one takes you seriously when you live at home. When you're 18 in a big city, on your own, and hustling to make something happen, a lot of people will respect that and help you out. It's just a completely different feeling & mindset living on your own than coming home to your parents.

Really the one and only advice is to move out asap.
Reply
#8
(12-14-2020, 10:24 AM)Suits Wrote: How old are you and where do you live?

OP said in another post a few months ago that he was 22: https://www.swooptheworld.com/forum/show...3#pid34353

Mikestar's reply to that post is also a good reply here:

(08-06-2020, 09:21 AM)Mikestar Wrote: ^ that’s the wrong mindset man, if you say “once I do this I will do this” you won’t lose your v card and get what you want. You have many options: Airbnb, hotel, car, beach, park, friends house. Hang out with some girls from your social circle or do online and go on a date, then prepare accommodation accordingly. Many people stay a Virgin because of all these excuses
If you haven't met anyone, I'll assume you're lying (h/t to Teedub from the old forum)
Reply
#9
Yeah I'm 22 and in the US. Im moving out as soon as I finish school, in less than a year. I have a good chunk of savings so even if unable to get a job right away, I can survive for a few years living in a studio.
Reply
#10
(12-14-2020, 02:56 PM)supertramp Wrote: Move out ASAP. When I was younger all my friends moved out after high school. We got part time jobs, went to school. We lived together in apartments. That's what everyone did. We took jobs like waiters or busboys and worked our way up. It was a fun and important part of my life.

I see a lot of kids still living with their parents after high school and I'd say get out of the house as fast as you can. The sooner you start the better. We all started this way before.

I have a 6 figure business. I travel for 2 months a year. Staying at home I would have had a harder time in life. And it would have taken me longer to succeed.

I don't say this to brag. But I think young kids get the wrong information that taking part time jobs and living with friends in an apartments is a bad thing. That it means you are poor or won't make it or something. But it is the opposite. It's fun and you grow up quick doing it.

The sooner you move out of the house the better. Parents will still treat you as children when you are in their house. They don't mean to but that is all they know. When you leave the house they start to look at you a bit different. As you are not in the house and on your own. That's a good thing.

I agree with you and did exactly the same thing that you did-moved out at 18 into the city and shared an apartment with two buddies and worked shitty jobs as I went to school. I also partied hard and did a lot of drugs, to the point where one of my uni professors commented about it, so at about 21, I moved back in with my parents to focus on school and not do cocaine and disco biscuits every weekend. So I would caution OP to weigh your options, there's a lot of variables and in today's job market, it may be tough to find entry level work.

OP I would focus on school, networking, etc to try to maximize your chances of finding a good job in your field when you graduate. This Covid BS has really done a job on western economies, I'm glad I finished school at your age in 2006 when the economy here in Canada was booming, it's not so easy for young guys these days.
Reply
#11
A park or a car and no pun intended at some quiet carpark can be exhilarating.
Sizes of cars on average seem to be huge in Murica offering more room for backseat action unlike the buzzboxes in Europe and probably Asia too.
Reply
#12
(12-14-2020, 02:07 PM)Kangaroo Wrote: Finish school, join gym, find a part time job, move out, learn to cook

No need to learn how to cook, that is what women are for
I be nutting in these bitches!
https://youtu.be/ixCrLAgk4YI
Reply
#13
(12-25-2020, 11:47 PM)Mister Happy Wrote:
(12-14-2020, 02:07 PM)Kangaroo Wrote: Finish school, join gym, find a part time job, move out, learn to cook

No need to learn how to cook, that is what women are for
Not always. Women can keep your belly full, no doubt. You just got to watch what they throw in front of you. In America, a lot of girls just throw a lot of unhealthy shit together, so it's kind of hard to just eat what they make. Went over to my relatives a while back, and realized they ate far differently than I did. Diet wise, I would have gained twenty pounds if I ate most of their dishes.
Reply
#14
The only thing making me guilty about moving out is leaving my parents. My mom is a full time housewife who really took/takes care of and is attached to us kids. My dad also does activities with us. With us moving out they'll be all alone.
Reply
#15
(12-26-2020, 10:26 AM)terrific Wrote: The only thing making me guilty about moving out is leaving my parents. My mom is a full time housewife who really took/takes care of and is attached to us kids. My dad also does activities with us. With us moving out they'll be all alone.

Welcome to the lone wolf life. Not being a beta involves many choices, such as spending your time hunting instead of being warm and cozy at home. It's a life choice. If you prefer to be warm in cozy, find a traditional wife, get a 9-5 job, spend weekends and holidays at your parents' house.
I be nutting in these bitches!
https://youtu.be/ixCrLAgk4YI
Reply
#16
(12-26-2020, 10:26 AM)terrific Wrote: The only thing making me guilty about moving out is leaving my parents. My mom is a full time housewife who really took/takes care of and is attached to us kids. My dad also does activities with us. With us moving out they'll be all alone.
Get away from her now! My siblings unfortunately fell into this trap, but I guarantee you do not need to be there. She is using you as an emotional support. You're a man. You are not fucking her. Keep her to the side, but do not give your life to your mother. Most men end up depressed because of this obligation.
Reply
#17
(12-26-2020, 04:56 PM)billydingdong Wrote: 'You are not fucking her'... Jesus Christ, it's your mom dude. 

It's one thing to encourage a guy to establish his independence, but I can't even contort my brain to see it through this fucked up prism. And my brain is pretty fucking warped.
So what if she's your mom. This is not about having a warped brain. In fact, I would say someone's brain is warped if they still care what their mother thinks, especially a man.

A woman can and will make her sons the other men in her life to control. The difference to her is that she is not fucking them, either. But she will put him under the same standards as the father.

"Take out the trash, mow the lawn, clean your room, be back at x time, call me every day, tell me where you are, you can't do this" and all the list of things a mother can and will do to her own husband/ boyfriend/ your father if they are in the same household. The mothers that do not want their children to leave tend to be single mothers cause they lack a male figure in their lives. Yes, mothers with husbands / fathers in the house can still long for their son, but a strong male figure usually tells the son/ daughter to go live their life while putting the emotional mother in her place.

I know you're probably wondering why I am saying to treat your mother like any other woman, and the answer is that she is like any other woman. All problems men have with their mothers are solved by treating them as any other woman. Don't fall for their shit tests, show that you're more valuable and independent without her, and 99% of the time they drop all their bs. There are times when it will make them explode, but like all women this settles down eventually cause in the end a woman still considers a man that holds frame to be stronger. Her brain cannot unsee this, even from her own son.

If something bad happened to a mother, and she had two sons: one who lived on his own and knew how to take care of his life vs. the hipster in college who cries to her all the time, which son will she go to at her time of need?
Reply
#18
... misread post + thread and gave consolation/advice to OP where none was needed.

OP, I remember very well being 18 and chafing at the bit to get out of my folks' house. After reading through the thread it looks like you're going about it the right way.
Reply
#19
(12-26-2020, 05:11 PM)Manbeline Wrote: So what if she's your mom. This is not about having a warped brain. In fact, I would say someone's brain is warped if they still care what their mother thinks, especially a man.

A woman can and will make her sons the other men in her life to control. The difference to her is that she is not fucking them, either. But she will put him under the same standards as the father.

"Take out the trash, mow the lawn, clean your room, be back at x time, call me every day, tell me where you are, you can't do this" and all the list of things a mother can and will do to her own husband/ boyfriend/ your father if they are in the same household. The mothers that do not want their children to leave tend to be single mothers cause they lack a male figure in their lives. Yes, mothers with husbands / fathers in the house can still long for their son, but a strong male figure usually tells the son/ daughter to go live their life while putting the emotional mother in her place.

I know you're probably wondering why I am saying to treat your mother like any other woman, and the answer is that she is like any other woman. All problems men have with their mothers are solved by treating them as any other woman. Don't fall for their shit tests, show that you're more valuable and independent without her, and 99% of the time they drop all their bs. There are times when it will make them explode, but like all women this settles down eventually cause in the end a woman still considers a man that holds frame to be stronger. Her brain cannot unsee this, even from her own son.

The manosphere has infected your brain if you are thinking about shit tests when talking to your mother.
Reply
#20
(12-26-2020, 07:59 PM)Shifty Wrote: The manosphere has infected your brain if you are thinking about shit tests when talking to your mother.
Nothing about the manosphere. It's just something I came about myself in a retrospection of the mother figures in my racial community. Your mother is not an exception nor is she is immune to being a woman. In fact, being her son makes you more vulnerable to her habits that she does to a lover, cause she knows you are her son and will use that to guilt trip you about it. That weak spot alone is what makes men do things like visit their mother rather than spending time with their own family and wife/ gf, or doing other irrational things that are correlated to the concept of "beta love."

Loving your mother is no different from expressing love to a woman, and I dare say a lot of men become simps to their family [mother, outside family] in general. Emotional dependency. Guilt is also an emotion. "She raised me, so I must show her undying love." Or else OP is currently in "I don't want to make her sad when I leave."
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)