Career vs Travel
#41
(11-14-2020, 02:44 AM)Dash Wrote: I was referring to the post that was talking about pivoting a nice corporate gig remotely.

I don't think it's a given to even be able to secure a nice corporate gig, let alone pivot that to remote work.

As for what you are discussing ie independently building skills and working freelance, thats more doable.

Although, i am not sure everyone has the mental capacity and makeup to acquire those skills. I would be hesitant to think I could become a proficient coder with questionable math and critical thinking skills related to such work. Or have the creativity for creating and designing things. And then you bring up the other points.

I see many people acting as anyone can just do these things as a given.

I am just trying to temper expectations and hopefully people can have some back up plans.

Exactly. It's always suspicious when people act like these types of enviable lifestyle changes are so incredibly accessible when they're clearly not. Such posts always say how easy it is to attain a remote work setup earning 5k per month without proffering any viable paths other than "learn to code, man". Not everyone is good at coding, and that seems to be the only job that ever gets talked about in terms of the ease of pivoting from corporate to remote/freelance. Tempering expectations is definitely wise.
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#42
One thing I never liked about the PUA culture is this unrealistic optimism. No one is buying/selling anything here so we can dispense with the marketing.

Check out an old site like happierabroad.com/forum and see what many people get in reality. I don't post there since it's mostly hopeless people and nutjobs in fantasy land (like some other places...), but it's a great place to bring expectations down to reality. A guy on there was talking about how he went back to school and did a post baccleurete in CS.... but he found he could barely get a job afterwards due to age discrimination and being a mediocre coder.

Its possible to have a great career... but there won't be traveling much. Travel and location independence on a modest income are possible... but career will be limited. Some people combine both, but its usually those who really "get" tech.

Gotta be realistic in life... "You can be anything you set your mind to!" is a what they say to children. In reality, you can accomplish a lot with time and hard work but within limits.
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#43
(11-14-2020, 03:36 PM)Blake2 Wrote: One thing I never liked about the PUA culture is this unrealistic optimism. No one is buying/selling anything here so we can dispense with the marketing.

Check out an old site like happierabroad.com/forum and see what many people get in reality.  I don't post there since it's mostly hopeless people and nutjobs in fantasy land (like some other places...),  but it's a great place to bring expectations down to reality. A guy on there was talking about how he went back to school and did a post baccleurete in CS....  but he found he could barely get a job afterwards due to age discrimination and being a mediocre coder.

Its possible to have a great career... but there won't be traveling much. Travel and location independence on a modest income are possible... but career will be limited.  Some people combine both,  but its usually those who really "get" tech.

Gotta be realistic in life... "You can be anything you set your mind to!" is a what they say to children. In reality,  you can accomplish a lot with time and hard work but within limits.

Bolded: I never saw that in government contracting.  Like ever.  And I was a hiring manager for years.  At many places I worked, we just wanted a warm body to fill an open position and get that revenue coming in.  Note: I was in IT System Administration/Engineering (jobs aplenty) but had certifications in project management, cyber security, process improvement and so on so I could hire for those positions.  Companies can't even fill all the cybersecurity positions available.
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#44
OviOs


Bolded: I never saw that in government contracting.  Like ever.  And I was a hiring manager for years.  At many places I worked, we just wanted a warm body to fill an open position and get that revenue coming in.  Note: I was in IT System Administration/Engineering (jobs aplenty) but had certifications in project management, cyber security, process improvement and so on so I could hire for those positions.  Companies can't even fill all the cybersecurity positions available.


^ Do you have any tips on cybersecurity as a career path for a guy in his early 30s? I am interested in it but there's so much conflicting information about how to get started. Some say do Security+ by CompTIA, others say I'll need a post-grad or masters.
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#45
Ovios,
I agree. It was probably due to the guy being a mediocre coder which is what he himself admitted.

I've heard from others who also ended up working 40-50k per year jobs in mid sized midwestern cities, no chance for remote work.

I did meet a guy who got into software sales and did that remotely with an an 80k salary, but he told me such jobs were rare.

So it is possible, but need to look.
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#46
(11-14-2020, 06:24 PM)irishguy Wrote: OviOs


Bolded: I never saw that in government contracting.  Like ever.  And I was a hiring manager for years.  At many places I worked, we just wanted a warm body to fill an open position and get that revenue coming in.  Note: I was in IT System Administration/Engineering (jobs aplenty) but had certifications in project management, cyber security, process improvement and so on so I could hire for those positions.  Companies can't even fill all the cybersecurity positions available.


^ Do you have any tips on cybersecurity as a career path for a guy in his early 30s? I am interested in it but there's so much conflicting information about how to get started. Some say do Security+ by CompTIA, others say I'll need a post-grad or masters.

There's Cybersecurity bootcamps now, see what they have to offer.
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#47
Agreed, much better to figure out if its for you with a bootcamp than with thousands sunk into a degree. Even better there are many free courses available. I highly recommend CS50  for an intro (https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-introdu...er-science), and https://www.edx.org/learn/cybersecurity further on.
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#48
(11-14-2020, 11:02 AM)irishguy Wrote:
(11-14-2020, 02:44 AM)Dash Wrote: I was referring to the post that was talking about pivoting a nice corporate gig remotely.

I don't think it's a given to even be able to secure a nice corporate gig, let alone pivot that to remote work.

As for what you are discussing ie independently building skills and working freelance, thats more doable.

Although, i am not sure everyone has the mental capacity and makeup to acquire those skills. I would be hesitant to think I could become a proficient coder with questionable math and critical thinking skills related to such work. Or have the creativity for creating and designing things. And then you bring up the other points.

I see many people acting as anyone can just do these things as a given.

I am just trying to temper expectations and hopefully people can have some back up plans.

Exactly. It's always suspicious when people act like these types of enviable lifestyle changes are so incredibly accessible when they're clearly not. Such posts always say how easy it is to attain a remote work setup earning 5k per month without proffering any viable paths other than "learn to code, man". Not everyone is good at coding, and that seems to be the only job that ever gets talked about in terms of the ease of pivoting from corporate to remote/freelance. Tempering expectations is definitely wise.

Nope, my post was based on marketing and sales jobs & freelancing. Nowhere in my post did I even mention coding (I suck at coding). If you've paid your dues early in your career and worked a challenging job and at a legit company, then pivoting to remote and freelance work becomes really easy.

$5k/month is 2-3 clients and EASILY DOABLE with any skill if you're competent whether it's marketing, graphic design or coding.
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#49
(11-16-2020, 10:02 PM)finallyfree Wrote:
(11-14-2020, 11:02 AM)irishguy Wrote:
(11-14-2020, 02:44 AM)Dash Wrote: I was referring to the post that was talking about pivoting a nice corporate gig remotely.

I don't think it's a given to even be able to secure a nice corporate gig, let alone pivot that to remote work.

As for what you are discussing ie independently building skills and working freelance, thats more doable.

Although, i am not sure everyone has the mental capacity and makeup to acquire those skills. I would be hesitant to think I could become a proficient coder with questionable math and critical thinking skills related to such work. Or have the creativity for creating and designing things. And then you bring up the other points.

I see many people acting as anyone can just do these things as a given.

I am just trying to temper expectations and hopefully people can have some back up plans.

Exactly. It's always suspicious when people act like these types of enviable lifestyle changes are so incredibly accessible when they're clearly not. Such posts always say how easy it is to attain a remote work setup earning 5k per month without proffering any viable paths other than "learn to code, man". Not everyone is good at coding, and that seems to be the only job that ever gets talked about in terms of the ease of pivoting from corporate to remote/freelance. Tempering expectations is definitely wise.

Nope, my post was based on marketing and sales jobs & freelancing. Nowhere in my post did I even mention coding (I suck at coding). If you've paid your dues early in your career and worked a challenging job and at a legit company, then pivoting to remote and freelance work becomes really easy.

$5k/month is 2-3 clients and EASILY DOABLE with any skill if you're competent whether it's marketing, graphic design or coding.

My skill is writing. I've been freelancing for 4 years without prior experience as a writer, and never earned above 3k in a month. I never paid my dues in a challenging job at a legit company, so maybe that's the issue. Or maybe writing is one of those notoriously difficult skills to earn certain amounts in because there is no barrier to entry at all. Fuck knows.

I will never earn 5k per month though, and I'm a solid writer. The difficulty with freelancing in anything is that you need to be an excellent marketer as well; your skills don't count for much if you can't spend a lot of time reaching out to companies with personalized emails, trying to convince them to hire you.
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#50
Have you considered technical writing? I don't know anything about the field but I read an inspiring article where a guy in his 40s with translating and writing background learns how to code. Based on his Linkedin profile this seems to have helped him to land a technical writer job.

https://github.com/Dhghomon/programming_at_40

I think he exemplifies what many posters here are saying that you should try stacking new skills on top of your existing ones instead of starting something new from scratch.
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#51
(11-17-2020, 11:05 AM)Apoc Wrote: Have you considered technical writing? I don't know anything about the field but I read an inspiring article where a guy in his 40s with translating and writing background learns how to code. Based on his Linkedin profile this seems to have helped him to land a technical writer job.

https://github.com/Dhghomon/programming_at_40

I think he exemplifies what many posters here are saying that you should try stacking new skills on top of your existing ones instead of starting something new from scratch.

Yeah, I was thinking of doing a course in technical writing or even a post-grad. Thanks for the link. I've long felt that learning to code would be beneficial and complement my writing skills, but I don't think I have the brain for it.  I had one coding module in my undergrad course and the project was to create tic-tac-toe in some language that I can't remember. Anyway, all I remember is struggling like fuck for hours and hating it. Maybe that language just didn't click with me. I will probably give coding one further attempt and try to learn Python in my spare time; particularly as it would complement my undergrad degree and land me in a position where I'm attractive to employers for junior data analyst roles. I see my future in one of 3 paths: data analyst, cybersecurity, or web developer.
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#52
(11-14-2020, 06:24 PM)irishguy Wrote: OviOs


Bolded: I never saw that in government contracting.  Like ever.  And I was a hiring manager for years.  At many places I worked, we just wanted a warm body to fill an open position and get that revenue coming in.  Note: I was in IT System Administration/Engineering (jobs aplenty) but had certifications in project management, cyber security, process improvement and so on so I could hire for those positions.  Companies can't even fill all the cybersecurity positions available.


^ Do you have any tips on cybersecurity as a career path for a guy in his early 30s? I am interested in it but there's so much conflicting information about how to get started. Some say do Security+ by CompTIA, others say I'll need a post-grad or masters.

For the majority of cybersecurity career paths, I see at least two ways: 

1) Start in the trenches at Tier 1 and work your way up building your resume and contacts while having companies pay for your certifications, training, etc. 

2) Accept a junior position after acquiring a couple of relevant certifications from CompTIA, Microsoft and/or EXIN among others.  You should have at least some working knowledge of the IT field.  You could also study for interview questions you will receive to improve your chances.
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#53
(11-14-2020, 02:29 AM)longships Wrote: But how can you acquire land if you're only making $60k a year and your options are property in Europe?  I believe European property is much more expensive than property in much of America.  So it seems following this path would keep you financially crippled for life, as you would miss out on property appreciation and income?

At €60k a year you'll get approval for a mortgage for €200k-€250k most places in Europe. Add in some savings on top of that and you're looking at the guts of €300k to work with, which will buy an apartment anywhere. Live in that while you're working in the city, then rent it out/sell it when you decide to leave.

European property is also mostly only expensive in the big, wealthier cities. There are lots of very cheap places on the continent. So the other option would be to buy an investment property somewhere outside of the city you're working in either.
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