Deadend jobs datasheet- What we learned
#1
TL;DR: 
I worked all these crappy jobs and yet I’m still standing. I learned some pretty handy skills and for the most part I live below my means. I can kind of empathize with my excoworkers but conversely I would never want to go back to these hell holes. 


My background: 
I have worked at least 3 years but less than 10 years doing dead end jobs. This is in spite of having a bachelors in a technical degree. I have done gig economy work and worked multiple jobs. I’ve had periods where I worked 60-70 hours per week and in spite of all this I never made more than 40K. The kicker is doing these deadend jobs was more rewarding than my technical degree. I learned much more getting my hands dirty than conducting research in an ivory tower. As I type this I’m in a much better place but that can change rapidly, so stay thirsty. 


Worst job I’ve ever had was at a place that didn’t do background checks and only had 1 bathroom in the workplace. My overseeing manager lived a crappy life and she was one of the most ghetto pieces of trash I have ever met. The hiring store manager (not my manager) definitely white outed my agreed upon rate and my check kept coming up short. I have never worked at a place that blatantly violated labor laws so that was a new low. The owners who ran the place were dicks. The biggest takeaway with this horrible experience was I for the most part live below my means. 


One of the worst people I have ever met was a guy who had at least 1 baby momma who would call crying every other week. The guy was a classic dark triad. I learned more about human nature working with this psychopath than I learned anything about human nature in all my years in uni. Like the previous job this job didn’t do background checks. 


Other undesirables: 
  • I worked at a place where an applicant lied about his criminal history of battery. The background check nabbed him and he was fired. Several months later he gets rehired and then months later he gets fired for threatening to fight a manager.
  • I had a customer who pestered us repeatedly. Biggest attention whore ever. You learn to get a read on people that want to cause trouble. Every skill you learn to a proficient level increases your chances of success.

Upward advancement in these fields (or any other field for the matter) is all about kissing ass and in rarer cases luck. For some of the more technical oriented people that may be reading this don’t be mad, get people skills. To tie this to the previous paragraph sometimes all it takes is lying about management experience at a previous job. Your managers don’t know what to do sometimes. I’ve had one that broke down in tears when we were having a critical situation. I’ve had another one who almost certainly got promoted because my boss had it out for his boss. I’ve had another one who my coworkers and I would usually see for 10 minutes at the end of the shift. I always thought he took extended lunch breaks to visit his family in the suburbs. 


Pay raises blow. I’ve had one scenario where the manager lied about an incident to deny me pay but not before the other manager ran up to me to sign this paper stating I won’t appeal my raise because you know, “your employer cares about you!”


You grow with your coworkers in the trenches. I still talk to my coworkers every now and then. Some of them are unfortunately older people that are unmarried, divorced, making minimum wage, etc. To a very small degree I do have some empathy for these people as I once was in their shoes. But as you can tell with how technology is moving these days people are going to be automated. I think there’s a small percentage that work these types of jobs that leave and never return (like me). The “others” prefer a life of security even if it means working in horrible conditions. I have told this to other people and sometimes I get disagreements but I stand by my assertion, “90% of people in retail are losers but after the age of 30 99% of them are losers.” 


One of my more memorable coworkers was an older 50s gentleman that was in the restaurant business for 30+ years. I asked him a ton of questions and he was generous with his time. He never went to college and he just grinded it out for all those years. I hope he retired to Florida like he always wanted. 


Best advice I can give to anyone in this phase of their career is to plan your exit out. The second best advice is keep working and get a second job. If one place is disrespecting you beyond your limits leave. 

Go ahead and share your deadend job and what you learned. Please don't be a negative nancy though thanks!
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#2
As long as you consistently pay into a 401k or another type of savings then its not a waste.

Whats a huge waste of time is working jobs you hate with nothing to show for it years later.
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#3
This can become the 'what jobs to avoid' thread, which actually can be very useful.

From my part, I'm highly educated and since graduating I had only decent jobs, but before as a student I had some valuable experiences in real shit jobs.

Worst of all for sure was working in a food factory where they make these prepared salads like kip curry and crab and whatnot. It was horrible from start to finish. Industrial smelly shitty environment. All coworkers were complete losers and some probably criminals (I liked those more). Work is the same boring routine over and over where you don't learn shit. I worked another similar job in a chocolate factory which was also shit but not that bad. When I was working there, there was this older guy and he bragged to me how he had been working there already 30 years. For me that was a real eyeopener, I wanted to get the fuck out after day one and here is a guy who has some sort of pride for being 30 years in this shithole having no life whatsoever. People are not equal! The first one I give a 2/10, second 3/10.

Other jobs I did:
-Unloading/picking orders from trucks: pretty shitty but an all male environment generally and you shoot the shit a lot, it was bad but doable as a young guy working to get some cash. 5/10
-Maintaining a book selling store: not too bad as it was in the student area, so there were some hot girls coming by and it's a relaxed and clean environment, pay is low 6/10
-Supermarket, filling the racks and doing the cash register: yeah pretty sad job also, I worked at the cheapest supermarket of all so it was just poor people mainly coming in always asking dumb questions or help for things they could do themselves. The worst part was that even if you were late for a minute you would get called out like you are supposed to be a fucking robot, a plus was some other younger guys you worked with were pretty cool and you can chat a bit while filling in the water, beers, coca cola etc. 4/10
-Data input, well yeah, that was another extremely dead-end job, sitting on a desk entering sheet info the whole day, I did this for a short time only, but after months you would no doubt become a zombie. 3/10
-Not even a job you would say, but testing medicines lol, now that was not bad at all. Getting fed, lying around watching movies with some other dudes a couple of days and getting maximum pay. Never got any real worrisome effects from the meds. Risks are there though I guess, but if you do your research and have an inside connection (I knew a doctor), they can tell you which ones are risk-free pretty much and the money will be worth it. 7/10

All these did contribute to me making sure I'd never end up in those places, which I guess is the real lesson you learn. They also gave me some hard-earned cash which I spent on booze n travel and thus opening my eyes to better places n possibilities, so they played their part in me having the life I have now.
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#4
@Rotten
"All coworkers were complete losers and some probably criminals (I liked those more)."
Hence why I say 90% of retail workers are losers and after the age of 30 99% are losers.

Now that I think of it I worked with a guy who has been washing dishes for 30 years...sometimes looking in the mirror and admitting you suck is too hard for people. Will bet hard earned money the guy never made more than 50K legally.

My all time favorite loser coworker is one who owed 100K in student loans from a no name acting school. Mid 30s now and when I told him about a job I was applying to that could make 100K+ he said he wouldn't do it because xyz. I delted his number and my best guess is he's still pouring coffee and if he's lucky he's banging some ugly broad.

DV

While I do have money in a 401K I don't believe in the concept. I've had an employer that deposited money but that was because of some paperwork snafu. Off the top of my head it's less than 1K. I also don't understand why you would want to keep money locked away decades when you're too old to enjoy it.

I think in the distant future when corporate power becomes even stronger there will be a renege in these promises. I stopped talking to people about my theories in real life since they don't think it will happen and they write me off as stupid. It's already happening over here in Chicago where people over 50 probably will get their public retirement pension money but those who are younger will not. I hate to be around when the riots start so that's why I'm working on getting out of this city.

Don't get me wrong I do have money saved up but I don't agree with 401Ks and pensions.
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#5
@ChicagoFire: these jobs were all in food service or other sectors too?

I'll start working on a datasheet of my former field, mechanical engineering design. While it can be a decent field if you are passionate about it and competent, there are certainly traps to avoid and some depressing pockets of it which I could only most optimistically describe as "higher end survival jobs".

For what it's worth a lot of the crap from my old high end survival job overlaps with your dead end shitlists above.
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#6
One of my first full time jobs was so fucking horrible and mindless, I was only a few months into being 18 and I was working with a guy that was about mid 50's and making a shitty wage. I think at that point he was about 15 years there and I remember how could this guy be here that long and I almost quit the job at lunch time on my first day because it was so boring. I toughed it out and after a week or two I started hanging out with the "cool" people and we would go for lunch everyday, they would get stoned and we'd make fun of the douchebags we worked with.

One buddy there was about 5-6 years older and he was funny but he kissed ass once in a while, he was pretty good with the chicks and is now married to the owners daughter and running another location in a different city, making 6 figures while the daughter is waiting for her 7-8 figure inheritance.

A lot of the people there were total losers, ghetto trash covered in tattoos and lived off smokes and energy drinks. The turnover rate was pretty high and it was interesting to see the new people show up and get fired a week or two later.

Although I didn't directly work with any women in my section you'd run into them in the break room, they would often do stupid shit like make sure no one of the guys had bikini calendars up in their sections, which really seemed weird to me considering the office people would never go back there anyway.

I forget exactly how long I stayed there but it was about 6-8 months and then I had enough money to travel, it was my first solo trip and at 18 it was a good experience to go overseas.
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#7
(11-24-2019, 03:57 AM)Stealth Wrote: @ChicagoFire: these jobs were all in food service or other sectors too?  

I'll start working on a datasheet of my former field, mechanical engineering design.  While it can be a decent field if you are passionate about it and competent, there are certainly traps to avoid and some depressing pockets of it which I could only most optimistically describe as "higher end survival jobs".

For what it's worth a lot of the crap from my old high end survival job overlaps with your dead end shitlists above.

If the mod can retitle to a better title go for it. I only speak about what I really know about, in this case I worked a lot of low paying jobs nobody in their right mind should work in especially if they're over 30. 

Most of my job history after I turned 20 was in food service. I have done some gig economy work. You learn to outwork people and even when you're on top of the world it becomes a habit. 

Also technology is rapidly advancing. I can easily see within 5 years the food industry will be making cuts to the labor force. Amazon already has cashierless express stores. What will happen to the unemployed is beyond me. 

@SC87
I bet your buddy is Triple H  Big Grin
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#8
I'm from a working class background so I had to work some shit jobs in my late teens and early 20s to get by. Among those jobs, I was the team lead night shift for a data entry company - and most of my coworkers were teenage girls. If I had even a drop of game back then I woulda slayed, they flirted hard with me. Biggest regret of my life was holing myself up in a relationship during those years and otherwise not knowing what the fuck to do to be a flirty dude. This also extends to my jobs in food service and retail, where there are a lot of young chicks, and everyone is fucking each other. It was a missed opportunity as far as I see it. If you put 2019 year old me in that situation I would be Gengas Khan.

That said, fastforward 20 years and you have me in an office environment where I have to walk on my tippie toes with the chicks and forget about flirting. Last chick I banged at work was in 2016 right before Me Too...
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#9
(11-24-2019, 05:04 PM)fullthrottle Wrote: I'm from a working class background so I had to work some shit jobs in my late teens and early 20s to get by. Among those jobs, I was the team lead night shift for a data entry company - and most of my coworkers were teenage girls. If I had even a drop of game back then I woulda slayed, they flirted hard with me. Biggest regret of my life was holing myself up in a relationship during those years and otherwise not knowing what the fuck to do to be a flirty dude. This also extends to my jobs in food service and retail, where there are a lot of young chicks, and everyone is fucking each other. It was a missed opportunity as far as I see it. If you put 2019 year old me in that situation I would be Gengas Khan.

That said, fastforward 20 years and you have me in an office environment where I have to walk on my tippie toes with the chicks and forget about flirting. Last chick I banged at work was in 2016 right before Me Too...

For full disclosure I have never had an office job let alone work in corporate America. I never even got promoted past entry level ffs. The bolded sounds like the definition of hell. I will agree and I was in the same boat as you, working low paying dead end jobs with young girls puts you in a position to be the flirty fun guy. I didn't close because I had a specific goal I had at the time. There was at leat one hottie I could have fucked but I wanted to fulfill my mission. 

The end goal I want is to run my own business and not have to deal with PC bullshit. My next door neighbor is pretty red pilled and he owns his own business. He didn't read he just did it. My current plan is to build up political capital, get the skills, learn from my failures, and above all else take massive action everday.
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#10
Just wanted to butt in and ask what classifies a dead end job?

One that's manual or repetitive or one where you are working to make someone else good coin while being stuck on a set pay rate with no hope of making more or moving up?

Only bringing this up because I've done some higher paid jobs that were still "dead ends" (you reach a ceiling and repeat the same thing year after year)...
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#11
In high school, I worked as a line cook at a fast food chain for a month, before stocking shelves and cashiering for the rest of the summer at a grocery chain that prided itself on being cheap.

Down-to-earth coworkers at the fast food joint, but I'd always come home smelling like the food. Couldn't eat it for years afterward.

Grocery store was ok.

But both jobs made me glad I was going to college, so I wouldn't have to work jobs like that forever. They also made me choose a major that would ensure that - no underwater basket weaving here.
Visa Tips | LTR Lessons | "When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers."
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#12
I had one job where I was working in a mailroom. I was working within the office of a bigger company but worked for another company (kinda complicated and won't name the companies for obvious reasons).

I had to, open 100-200 letters per day, sort them out, scan them all, while at the same time give parcels to the people who were in the bigger office.  Some co-workers were not even bilingual, so I was the 'useful idiot' who had to make more work than them, because I speak 7-8 languages. It could have been easy BUT once someone left or was sick in the mailroom, it was difficult to keep up with work and when you try to get things done faster, you make mistakes. So far so good, we all do mistakes, however what killed it for me, were these details of details of policies we had to respect. The supervisor (who was female, single mom and had mixed children) always came up with some new shit of policies that we had to respect.

I never lost my cool with her, but played dumb and gave 'obvious' answers. Afterwards I was fired and they tried to say, 'oh yeah but you did a good job and bla' but hey, I was happy I got fired, at least I could claim for some unemployment money and find a better job which I did. Wink

To sum it up, I think that jobs with too many silly policies can also be considered dead-end jobs, especially if the boss or supervisor is a woman. They are obsessed with details , but always forget what they said few days ago. Moreover, don't consider jobs where you are the useful idiot.
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#13
I spent a year in an entry-level technical job at a small town business of about 100 employees. I was underpaid relative to the industry by about 20%, but so was everybody else. The founder had started the business in his garage and knew a very little bit about managing manufacturing processes, but had tried to branch into tech and didn't understand how that worked at all. Most of the employees on the manufacturing side were just trying to scam their way through holding down their jobs, which mostly doing whatever they could to evade accountability. Example: it's your job to approve specifications, but if you ignore emails asking you to sign them until deadlines approach and people push forward without you, you can later blame everyone else for proceeding without your signature.

Looking back, it was a nuthouse. I was given a bunch of marketing copy that was written at a 7th-grade level, full of errors, so I cleaned it up and asked the Asian girl in marketing who wrote it to approve it. I got back a two-page screed copying the CEO calling me the tech team's "killer" who had "slaughtered" her beautiful copy. The VP was also semi-literate and didn't understand that the grammatical errors were errors. Same girl came up to our office one night while we were photographing products and stripped down for a photoshoot in her bra and panties. Another woman, who was blowing the VP, broke into our office over lunch and sent an email from one of our graphic artists' computers without disclosing that she wasn't the graphic artist.

What's weird is that even though I quit on bad terms at the one year mark, I still got a great reference from my direct report, who knew this was all insane. I am still friends with the team and came back around ten years later to poach them for new jobs that paid twice as much.

If there's any takeaway from that, it's that if you find yourself in that position, you shouldn't get complacent. You should be ready to move on as soon as you've been there long enough to make it look good on your resume, and should cultivate whatever good relationships with sane people that you possibly can because they'll probably be useful to your network later, and also be able to put a good light on your record there if things go south. I would never use that direct report as a reference today, mainly because I stole all his employees, but I can still honestly say that one of my coworkers was a senior employee who can speak to my work, despite having surpassed him by moving on.

(11-23-2019, 12:19 AM)Disco_Volante Wrote: As long as you consistently pay into a 401k or another type of savings then its not a waste.

Whats a huge waste of time is working jobs you hate with nothing to show for it years later.

There's a lot of good stuff in this thread but this is important.

Don't confuse your wage for your wealth. Wages aren't wealth. Wealth is the money you've locked up somewhere safe that you will still have when you lose the wages. If you're willing to live tight and below your means, you can still get ahead in that dead-end job and probably outrun a lot of people overextended on big houses and nice cars.

I don't recommend it, but it's possible and a good exercise in learning discipline.
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#14
With the exception of working for two months in a kitchen age 17, I've never had a dead end job. I've always done a job because I wanted to do it. Since 18 I was self employed, and since around 22 I haven't subcontracted to anyone except totally on my terms with my men and my machines. Now I don't do any job unless I want to- that's why I have staff.

I sometimes wonder if this has made me ill disciplined, or lazy, in a way that those of you who grinded in a dead end job for a few years are not. On the flip side, I'm always looking for an easier way, a cheat mode, if you like, to achieve what I want to achieve.
They who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety- Benjamin Franklin, as if you didn't know...
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#15
Define “dead-end”. When I was working as a line cook in a professional kitchen I had plenty of opportunities to move up and make more money. And that’s in a field that’s considered “low-skilled”.

Also, owning your business and “working for yourself” is not the end-all be-all of a man’s existence. Some of us enjoy working for others. Less stress, more free time etc. I know that goes against manosphere dogma but so be it. A lot of guys act like moving to the Phillipines and being a code monkey is heaven on Earth.
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#16
The idea is that you define it for yourself. If you perceived a job as being dead-end then write about it here, even if it could've been perceived in another fashion by someone else.
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#17
It is all what you make of it.  When I was a teenager I worked both in the food and factory sectors.  I learned both how to make delicious food and work on and think about machines.  The knowledge from both of those "shit-jobs" has held up well over the years.

When you are feeling blue about your job, just think of it "as a phase" -- plan your exit and look for your next great opportunity.
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#18
Sorry for derailing but yesterday I met up with a buddy of mine who did paramedic work for 8 years. Someone here could start up a medical careers datasheet and I can add my buddy's input. I am more than happy to probe him more if not even ask him if he wants to join this site. So once again, not trying to derail but if there's interest I'll do a more comprehensive writeup. Hint:

He paid 7K for college and thanks to the generous OT he makes 100K+ per year.
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#19
I'll be honest, I was fortunate enough to be able to quit almost any job that became intolerable.

The longest I ever stuck it out was two years at a dine-in theater. I was making minimum wage cleaning up garbage and working next to trash cans for 7-8 hours straight. I was only in college back then so I didn't really know what decent working conditions looked like. But what bothered me more were the people. I was only in college but I knew even then that I was around a group with a loser mentality that cared way too much about social politics for the positions they were in in life. Think of it as high school gossip while fighting for scraps. It just made me resent my co-workers, and I honestly didn't get along with anybody there besides a couple friends I already had before the job. We all agreed we'd never go back once we quit. That theater hired anybody that could breathe. People with disabilities and criminal records all under one roof. I don't have anything against either but it was truly an entry level job. What finally made me quit was that back then, I was transferring colleges to a school that was farther away and that required more of my time. I made the easy decision to quit and focus on school full-time.

Another job I quit this year was a part time one. For a while the job actually wasn't bad, as it was mainly just being on call for an elderly patron with physical limitations that might need help at night in his house. He slept for 9 of the 12 hours normally, so for a while I chilled most of the shift. Problem is on a different shift, he fell and his back never recovered, so he regressed to the physical skills of a toddler while not being able to remember anything. That made the job a lot more demanding and it got to a point where diapers had to be changed. After the first shift like that, I basically quit. But I was basically like one of the muscle guys in a nursing home, only with a private client who was easy to take care of for a long time. I could tell I wasn't cut out for being a real caretaker though so I give the girls credit that can do it for ok at best money.

401K isn't everything by the way. I know a family member that lost a ton of money in that during the last recession. Luckily now, despite not being in a full time job with benefits right now, I am happy with my work. I make less money than some of my friends, but I have absolutely no baggage from my work and limited stress during the jobs. I feel like an underrated aspect is if you can bare limited social interaction, working solo puts less stress on you than having co-workers with different mindsets to deal with.
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#20
You can put your 401k into gold and silver. What I mean is, it's easy to keep rationalizing how someday you'll get a financial windfall, therefore you don't need to save / 401k right now.

Then time flies by and you're 35 with nothing built up yet. If you started steady savings at 23 then by your mid 30s you'd have a nice nest egg built up already even if you had to change jobs several times.

So I'm saying do the steady build regardless of what you think might happen. Otherwise you end up 40 and broke.

So have something to show for your time, even if they were shit jobs.
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