Anybody into trail running?
#1
Been watching David Goggins lately and inspired the shit out of me. Signing up for a 70k ultra marathon in January.

I'm already quite fit from weight lifting and muay thai but this will obviously require a whole different level of endurance. 

Im mainly interested in running an ultra for mental discipline benefits. I hate running. I'm a bit heavy for long distance at 92kg. So will probably need to lose some mass. Don't want to lose too much though.

Getting great cardio conditioning aside, I've noticed a lot of successful people are into long distance running. Seems to build mental fortitude like nothing else.
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#2
(10-17-2019, 06:18 PM)SpecialEd Wrote: Been watching David Goggins lately and inspired the shit out of me. Signing up for a 70k ultra marathon in January.

I'm already quite fit from weight lifting and muay thai but this will obviously require a whole different level of endurance. 

Im mainly interested in running an ultra for mental discipline benefits. I hate running. I'm a bit heavy for long distance at 92kg. So will probably need to lose some mass. Don't want to lose too much though.

Getting great cardio conditioning aside, I've noticed a lot of successful people are into long distance running. Seems to build mental fortitude like nothing else.

I have an uncle who regularly ran full marathons all throughout his 20's and 30's and his hips and knees have been totally fucked since his late 60's and now in his 70's. Him hobbling around now and his lack of zest from chronic pain has been an eye-opener for me.

I've been in excellent shape before but at this point in mid-30's I'd rather play the long game and eat clean, jump rope, do my hour in the gym 3 times per week, and enjoy a little Sunday trot at the park.

edit: I guess to your point, mental fortitude can be forged elsewhere (without doing long-term damage to your body via ultra-endurance sports) if that's your thing — public speaking, career, Vipassana meditation, etc.
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#3
The reason I mentioned trail running specifically is gravel is way easier on the joints. It's also a lot more enjoyable. If I'm going to run for hours, I want to be in nature with some epic scenery.

There's an injury and/or arthritis risk with any type of activity.

https://www.caryortho.com/long-distance-...arthritis/

This study shows long distance runners have about half the rate of arthritis of the general population.
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#4
Video 
You can do trail running like this guy if you want to see cool nature 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIBbIWycPAY




But yeah, running of any kind is pretty retarded (so maybe that's appropriate, given your username here). It'll destroy your hips pretty badly. There are less painful ways to develop mental fortitude, if that's what you seek.
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#5
Lol human beings evolved for long distance running. There isnt another animal that can do it better.

Medical study showing more hip issues amongst long distance runners?

Cant drop statements like that without proof. Makes you sound like a tard.
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#6
I meant it causes knee problems, not sure why I said hips. All of my evidence for running causing knee issues in anecdotal, from my own experience and others. Majority of people I know who are/were runners are constantly getting injuries from it.

I read Born to Run. The author made interesting theories, but it sounded a lot like bro science to me. Saying humans evolved to run long distances so we could outrun gazelles, or whatever he said. Seems a bit far fetched
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#7
I was pretty into distance running for a few years, finished a few halfs and a marathon in half-decent time (sub 4 hours), and subsequently dropped it completely to focus on lifting and high intensity cardio. Getting back into it slowly, though I don't envision running a marathon again, let alone an ultra.

I'll just give my anecdotal experience -- distance running definitely fucked my knees up pretty bad for a good while. Worst of all, I would have these random little pains around my legs (sometimes hamstrings, sometimes ankles, etc) after long runs that would linger despite stretching, icing, etc. When I lift, I might be really sore for a few days, but I can tell that it is good pain. This just felt like shit pain that wasn't accomplishing anything. That's the reason I dropped distance running - I just got tired of hurting on and off constantly.

Trail running is a different beast and agreed that it is better than running on cement. I'd start off slow and build up over time. When I trained for my marathon, I would do several shorter runs (4-8 miles) on weekdays and then one long run on a Sat/Sun. The long run started at 10 miles and I built it up to 19. This helped a lot. As far as I know, distance trail runners do a similar type of schedule.

Your biggest challenge might be your body type. I'm guessing you're around 6ft? I'm 83kg at 5'11 (~14% bf) and would definitely consider myself too heavy for distance running. There's a reason why you see so few "big" dudes running marathons. It just isn't a natural fit.
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#8
^ What Dali said.

When I used to run (in my late teens/early 20's), I got lots of knee issues from running on cement. I figured trail running would hurt less, but it didn't. Even running on sand doesn't feel much better. Guess I'm genetically unfit for running long distances (6', ~180lbs).
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#9
(10-20-2019, 08:59 PM)mike Wrote: I meant it causes knee problems, not sure why I said hips. All of my evidence for running causing knee issues in anecdotal, from my own experience and others. Majority of people I know who are/were runners are constantly getting injuries from it.

I read Born to Run. The author made interesting theories, but it sounded a lot like bro science to me. Saying humans evolved to run long distances so we could outrun gazelles, or whatever he said. Seems a bit far fetched

Havent read Born To Run, but the science is irrefutable. Humans dont overheat when we run. We sweat vs. pant. It's very easy for most animals to die from overheating. This is probably something we evolved for long hunts - which when you've got to get close enough to use a spear or bow that's a long distance run. 

Cameron Hanes (bow hunter) does a marathon every weekend to stay in shape for his hunts.

You can get a bum knee from any sport, squats, etc. Maybe you're too fragile to workout.

(10-21-2019, 12:56 AM)Dali Wrote: I was pretty into distance running for a few years, finished a few halfs and a marathon in half-decent time (sub 4 hours), and subsequently dropped it completely to focus on lifting and high intensity cardio. Getting back into it slowly, though I don't envision running a marathon again, let alone an ultra.

I'll just give my anecdotal experience -- distance running definitely fucked my knees up pretty bad for a good while. Worst of all, I would have these random little pains around my legs (sometimes hamstrings, sometimes ankles, etc) after long runs that would linger despite stretching, icing, etc. When I lift, I might be really sore for a few days, but I can tell that it is good pain. This just felt like shit pain that wasn't accomplishing anything. That's the reason I dropped distance running - I just got tired of hurting on and off constantly.

Trail running is a different beast and agreed that it is better than running on cement. I'd start off slow and build up over time. When I trained for my marathon, I would do several shorter runs (4-8 miles) on weekdays and then one long run on a Sat/Sun. The long run started at 10 miles and I built it up to 19. This helped a lot. As far as I know, distance trail runners do a similar type of schedule.

Your biggest challenge might be your body type. I'm guessing you're around 6ft? I'm 83kg at 5'11 (~14% bf) and would definitely consider myself too heavy for distance running. There's a reason why you see so few "big" dudes running marathons. It just isn't a natural fit.

Yea it's rare. There's a growing movement of "hybrid" athletes combining both powerlifting/bodybuilding and long distance running. Nick Bare is a good one to watch on youtube. He's about my size.
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#10
How do you plan on splitting your week up training wise? I can imagine trail running would fuck with your recovery so interested to see how many times a week you'd be dedicating to running, MT and weightlifting.
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#11
Its a tough juggling act.

Think i'll do short runs (4-5 miles everyday) with a longer run on the weekend.

Muay thai actually helps with my conditioning as I can get 2-3 hours cardio in and the times goes by fast.

Will probably limits weights to 2x a week.
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#12
Running a regular marathon relatively unprepared is very tough, let alone a 70km ultra marathon. I would strongly advice against underestimating it and doing it in January which gives you only 2-3 months prep time.

As you've probably read in Goggins' book or heard on one of the YouTube videos / podcasts, he did something similar and almost died. Being fit from weightlifting isn't the same fitness you require for ultras.

Probably best to start with some half marathons and then a full marathon. In fact I doubt they will let you in without a proven track record of having run a marathon or something similar.

Now I'm aware you didn't disclose any prior experience, so you may well have it. In that case, consider this general advice for anyone reading.
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#13
Yea I realized the 70k might be a tad ambitious for my first one. Signed up for the half marathon instead. I think I should be able to run that with mininal training.
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