Teaching English in Thailand
#1
Hello, does anyone here teach English in Thailand
or have taught English in Thailand?

I'm looking at some TEFL programs in Thailand
and they look very appealing and would be fun to
do for a couple of months and then teach for a year or so.

I've never been to Chang Mai but I do like the Phuket area,
so that would the preferable teaching destination.
Would love to hear about your experiences or recommendations.
Reply
#2
Your issue is that you won't make that much compared to neighbouring countries.

If you are looking to pay your way through your salary it will be tough, last I checked it was around $900 or so a month salary.
And Thailand is expensive these days, very expensive.

If you have passive income already it could be fun.. way of getting long term residency and getting to know locals.. but the moneys bad and it doesn't go very far.
Reply
#3
Bienvenuto is on the money. The ESL game is a case study in micro-economics. Desirable countries pay less because there is a surplus of people willing to go there to teach. The less desirable the location, the higher the pay will be generally.

I love seeing desperate posts from guys who are obsessed with just one type of girl demanding information about how they can get the ESL job they are entitled to in Eastern Europe or South America.

Right now, unless you are particularly qualified, the only serious money seems to be in China. Vietnam is on the rise and Japan and Korea are stable (although given the number of guys with an unhealthy obsession with Japanese girls and culture, an ESL income in Japan won't pay for much of a lifestyle anymore), but China is where it's at.

Bad news, because getting a working visa for China has never been more difficult than it is in 2019 (at least since two decades ago).

If I was advising a younger guy who was just starting out, I'd strongly suggest Vietnam. COL is still relatively low and the ESL industry's management seems slightly more rational in Vietnam than it is currently in China, even after years of development. For example, I see teacher training positions in Vietnam frequently advertised. You'll very rarely see the same type of jobs posted for China, because the Chinese remain under the impression that they can do everything better than anyone else, except have native-speaker English pronunciation.

Vietnam is still flexible on the visa front and not uptight about side-work, which is where the real money is. My recommendation is always to get a daytime job (even if it's just being a warm, white body in a kindergarten classroom) and then stacking as many evening and weekend hours as possible.

You can usually get better pay by working at a training center with evening and weekend hours, but it leaves little to no time for doing your own private classes. When I was last in Beijing, I was earning $100 / hr doing these. Going rate for a newbie was $60 / hr. In Vietnam, it will in all likelihood be lower, but factoring in lower COL, it probably still shakes out very well there.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)