Adventure Travel
#1
Have any of you set out on some sort of daring adventure travel? 


When I was a senior in high school there was a kid who had graduated one year before and had road a bicycle from Los Angeles to Boston by himself. That was 10-years ago and it never left my memory.

Lately i've been considering doing some sort of long distance endurance trip myself. This would kick-off when I quit my job next year and begin traveling the world. My vision is to walk from California to Massachusetts... West to East along the American Discovery Trail by myself. Here's a link to the trail across America https://discoverytrail.org/. I would take the Southern Route. 

The walk is expected to take 10-12 months depending on your pace and is over 5,000 miles. The idea of embarking on such a physically challenging adventure really inspires me. Once I reached my destination in Massachusetts, I'd fly out of the states and begin an extended period of world travel.

Has anyone else done something like this? Whether it be a long distance bike ride, walk or another sort of physically challenging adventure challenge? I'm curious to hear your story. 

Here's a link to a short documentary about Mark Beaumont riding a bicycle from Egypt to South Africa in 41-days... crazy. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6ALH7Y-QF8
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#2
Yes, I once travelled from Tianjin to Bangkok (with only 7 days to do it to avoid missing my flight out of Bangkok) without doing any significant research in advance, aside from buying a train ticket from Beijing to Nanning.

Included in my plans was visiting a friend from university in Cambodia and another friend from high school in Bangkok.

I wasn't able to get a sleeper compartment ticket for the 28 hr journey from Beijing to Nanning, near the Vietnamese border. So, instead, I sat in the hard-seat section. If I remember correctly, a small child slept in my lap during the night. When I arrived in Nanning, a young woman who had been sitting near me and was aware of my plans (or lack of them) helped me find a hotel nearby the train station, which was useful, because we'd arrived late in the evening.

I speak Chinese, but I was glad to not have to hunt for a hotel that late at night.

The next morning, I took a taxi to the Nanning bus terminal where I'd read online that vans leave every morning bound for Hanoi. I found a suitable van and settled in for the 10 hour journey.

When I got to Hanoi, I learned that the buses for Laos did not leave till the next morning, so I stayed the night in a hotel. The bus to Laos was a sleeper bus. I'd never been in one before and wasn't even aware of such a vehicle. It was a small bus, so space was tight. Naturally, it was full of backpackers and it was easy to make some friend.

The middle-aged Japanese man aboard had his camera stolen at one of the rest stops along the way. Obviously, everyone who worked at the rest stop knew who stole it, but they played dumb, of course.

I got dropped off at a medium sized bus terminal in some city in Laos. I had no idea how to get to Cambodia, so after eating, I found a map on one wall and stopped some locals and pointed at where I wanted to go. They didn't speak English, but they brought me to a nearby office where the agent did and I got a ticket for another bus which left in about two hours. I wondered the nearby roads for an hour (there wasn't much to see, it was very rural) and then came back to wait for my bus.

This bus was bigger and I had a lot more space to myself. Across from me was a young Laos student who was returning from studying in Australia. I was taken aback by how everyone in Laos seemed incredibly relaxed.

The rest of the journey as uneventful. I made it to the capital city of Cambodia, called my friend from a stranger's phone and he took me to his parent's house where I stayed two nights. Then they took me back to the bus station and helped me buy a ticket to Bangkok.

In Bangkok I got dropped on what I now realize was Koh San Road. It as obviously easy to find a hotel there and I stayed two nights and spend some quality time with my high school mate before heading to the airport to get on my flight back to Canada.

Did I mention that I did this whole journey carrying more than 50km in luggage?
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#3
Not quite like you mentioned, but these days most of my trips are focused around hiking and rock climbing. In Colombia I spent a lot of time rock climbing in rural areas. I stayed in a couple of hostels in the mountains and saw cool places. I'm still building up my skills, but eventually I'm planning to take a bunch of road trips around North and South America and stopping in certain areas to climb. Eventually I want to get into more serious mountaineering and go for several weeks to remote areas. For now I'm putting this off until my business is more automated though.
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#4
(08-12-2019, 12:02 PM)mike Wrote: Not quite like you mentioned, but these days most of my trips are focused around hiking and rock climbing. In Colombia I spent a lot of time rock climbing in rural areas. I stayed in a couple of hostels in the mountains and saw cool places. I'm still building up my skills, but eventually I'm planning to take a bunch of road trips around North and South America and stopping in certain areas to climb. Eventually I want to get into more serious mountaineering and go for several weeks to remote areas. For now I'm putting this off until my business is more automated though.

I'm in the same boat. I've increasingly come to appreciate this kind of thing and I'd really like to try munro-bagging. I'm not sure I'm ever going to conquer Aonach Eagach, but there are some pretty accessible options for noobs in Scotland and I'd like to make a trip out of it sometime soon, and also see what skills can transfer into exploring the Arizona backcountry in the winter.
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#5
I adventure travel much of the year. Hiking in the spring and autumn in mountains in Europe, bicycle touring the southwest deserts of the USA in winter. Summer I rest in Kyiv, which is also my only chance for a sex life, since rest of the year I'm moving. Don't have a permanent home, just a storage locker and mailbox service. Average about 120 days camping per year, rest in hotels/motels or weekly apartments. I'm retired and have an income, which is how I pay for this life. Other than my Ukrainian rental girlfriend, my costs run about $15000/year: lodging, food and other daily consumables, transportation (one round trip between USA and Europe, two short flights within Europe, several bus trips), camping and bicycle gear. I haven't had health insurance for last 25 years.

I suggest you start with either the Appalachian or Pacific Crest trail (I've done both) to learn about hiking and camping. America Discovery trail more suitable for bicycles, IMO, and that means a lot more gear expertise. Better to master hiking and camping first, then maybe switch later to bicycles or off-road motor bike. Pick whichever trail most convenient. Better yet, start this autumn by doing a piece of the Appalachian trail rather than the whole thing, using whatever cheap gear you can scrounge up. You can learn a lot from just a month on the trail. In particular, you'll learn whether you like this lifestyle before making a big commitment.
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#6
(08-12-2019, 01:23 PM)Jetset Wrote:
(08-12-2019, 12:02 PM)mike Wrote: Not quite like you mentioned, but these days most of my trips are focused around hiking and rock climbing. In Colombia I spent a lot of time rock climbing in rural areas. I stayed in a couple of hostels in the mountains and saw cool places. I'm still building up my skills, but eventually I'm planning to take a bunch of road trips around North and South America and stopping in certain areas to climb. Eventually I want to get into more serious mountaineering and go for several weeks to remote areas. For now I'm putting this off until my business is more automated though.

I'm in the same boat. I've increasingly come to appreciate this kind of thing and I'd really like to try munro-bagging. I'm not sure I'm ever going to conquer Aonah Eagach, but there are some pretty accessible options for noobs in Scotland and I'd like to make a trip out of it sometime soon, and also see what skills can transfer into exploring the Arizona backcountry in the winter.

I recently went to Iceland and climbed Kirkjufell. It was one of my first proper rock scrambles on a real mountain. Standing on the summit by myself was life changing, it felt like I conquered something. After that experience, mountains like Aonah Eagach seem ideal.
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#7
I am going trout and salmon fishing in Estonia this October with Shemp's buddy, Iconoclast007. :-p

That is not really adventure tourism, I guess. But I am bringing some travel surf fishing rods and I am hitting up some rocky shores. The waves can get kinda high in this one place.

https://www.instagram.com/p/ByKWlg4CCAY/...4yegei5ahf

https://www.instagram.com/p/BqPKOrzB5Ax/...hv88ogo12a
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#8
(08-12-2019, 03:12 PM)shemp Wrote: I adventure travel much of the year. Hiking in the spring and autumn in mountains in Europe, bicycle touring the southwest deserts of the USA in winter. Summer I rest in Kyiv, which is also my only chance for a sex life, since rest of the year I'm moving. Don't have a permanent home, just a storage locker and mailbox service. Average about 120 days camping per year, rest in hotels/motels or weekly apartments. I'm retired and have an income, which is how I pay for this life. Other than my Ukrainian rental girlfriend, my costs run about $15000/year: lodging, food and other daily consumables, transportation (one round trip between USA and Europe, two short flights within Europe, several bus trips), camping and bicycle gear. I haven't had health insurance for last 25 years.

I suggest you start with either the Appalachian or Pacific Crest trail (I've done both) to learn about hiking and camping. America Discovery trail more suitable for bicycles, IMO, and that means a lot more gear expertise. Better to master hiking and camping first, then maybe switch later to bicycles or off-road motor bike. Pick whichever trail most convenient. Better yet, start this autumn by doing a piece of the Appalachian trail rather than the whole thing, using whatever cheap gear you can scrounge up. You can learn a lot from just a month on the trail. In particular, you'll learn whether you like this lifestyle before making a big commitment.

Thanks for sharing the details of your interesting lifestyle. I hope to eventually run my life in a similar fashion. Sounds like a simple, yet personally rewarding existence.

Good suggestion about taking on a smaller trail before committing to full-on cross country trek.

Praying for your continued health, be safe out there.
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#9
Interesting and reflective write-up on the exploits of Ralf Dujmovit, a man bent on summiting Everest without oxygen, relevant to the interests in this thread:

https://www.mensjournal.com/adventure/ra...ut-oxygen/
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#10
After living over 15 years in Asia, in 2006 I finally decided to conquer the remote corners of this world and I haven't looked back ever since. In April 2019 I was on the first camp in Mount Everest past the Basecamp and next year I am thinking about going into the Deep Woods of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In the past I had been traveling from Santiago de Chile all the way through the high Andean Mountains and the Atacama Desert into Argentina, Peru, Brazil with my own motorbike.

Being in the wild isolated south of Madagascar a few times as well as traveling to Sierra Leone and to some remote islands in the South Pacific. I think such kind of traveling combined with hunting girls is so interesting and engaging that every time I set foot back into Asia I rather wanna leave right away
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#11
(08-17-2019, 12:00 PM)timalemanha Wrote: After living over 15 years in Asia, in 2006 I finally decided to conquer the remote corners of this world and I haven't looked back ever since. In April 2019 I was on the first camp in Mount Everest past the Basecamp and next year I am thinking about going into the Deep Woods of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In the past I had been traveling from Santiago de Chile all the way through the high Andean Mountains and the Atacama Desert into Argentina, Peru, Brazil with my own motorbike.

Being in the wild isolated south of Madagascar a few times as well as traveling to Sierra Leone and to some remote islands in the South Pacific. I think such kind of traveling combined with hunting girls is so interesting and engaging that every time I set foot back into Asia I rather wanna leave right away

Sounds interesting man, hope you can share some stories/data on those places.
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#12
(08-17-2019, 12:00 PM)timalemanha Wrote: After living over 15 years in Asia,  in 2006 I finally decided to conquer the remote corners of this world and I haven't looked back ever since. In April 2019 I was on the first camp in Mount Everest past the Basecamp and next year I am thinking about going into the Deep Woods of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In the past I had been traveling from Santiago de Chile all the way through the high Andean Mountains and the Atacama Desert into Argentina, Peru, Brazil with my own motorbike.

Being in the wild isolated south of Madagascar a few times as well as traveling to Sierra Leone and to some remote islands in the South Pacific. I think such kind of traveling combined with hunting girls is so interesting and engaging that every time I set foot back into Asia I rather wanna leave right away

Thanks for sharing that. It's helpful to hear what's possible. These sorts of stories are exactly what I had in mind when I started this thread. Combining interesting travel and pursuing the local woman is what it's all about. 

Here's a link to a thread about a guy and his girlfriend that drove from Lubumbashi to Kinshasa, through the heart of the Democratic Republic of Congo. https://expeditionportal.com/forum/threa...asa.50799/

While it's not about picking up girls, it's an incredible account of the challenges of traveling through the DRC. This could be a helpful resource for your future travels. That thread is 65 pages long and exhaustively detailed, but a fascinating read. I spent an entire sunday reading through it. Lots of picture included.

What's your background; what led you to this lifestyle?
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#13
Yes, reading this trip in from Lubumbashi to Kinshasa, that's the kind of Adventure I talk about, the only difference is I would be stopping in the forest or villages to find some girls. ?

Well after I received my University degree from the University of Berlin I packed my bags and left for Bangkok and started my own internet business in 1995. That was a great decision and I never looked back. Southeast Asia was really good in the 90s but quickly degraded after 2004.

Nowadays I'm a precious gemstone dealer, dealing in rubies and sapphires from all the different countries I'm traveling.
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