Las Vegas Thread
#21
(02-07-2020, 12:49 AM)Dali Wrote: ^ I agree with most of what you said but Vegas is a bit different. Here's how the price becomes "justified".

From the point of view of a club, the audience they are catering to first and foremost are attractive women. If the club has attractive women, the men (and the bottle service) will follow. Narrowing it down further, the most desired demographic are 21-24 year old girls who come with their big group of friends. 

Good analysis. I think one part to emphasize is tables. That's where all the money is, and a lot of it is corporate money. Vegas now has as many or more visitors coming to attend conferences as coming for gambling, and conference visitors spend the more than gamblers on food & beverage (corporate expense accounts). So you get some guy at a conference in his 40s or 50s and he's got an expense account to take out his clients and show them a good time. $5-10k spend on a table is well within his expense account limits if the clients are big enough (one friend of mine was on the receiving side of this at a club in Vegas, and the bill was $25k). The clubs definitely need the attractive women there as no guy wants to hang out at a club full of dudes with nothing to ogle, but then it's these guys with the tables who really bring in the money.

As for Marshmello getting $600k per show -- Celine Dion got $500k/show for her residency back nearly 10 years ago, so $600k isn't totally out of line. I'm guessing the owners took a gamble that Marshmello would bring in the crowds and build the club's reputation, then they'll cut him loose after a few months.

(02-07-2020, 02:35 AM)captain_shane Wrote: Anyone know how much those club promoters make that those clubs have out on the streets?

Or how they get paid? Per person I imagine.

The tough thing about being a promoter in Vegas is it's almost all tourists, so even if you find some good "clients" to bring in, they'll be gone in a few days. It's hard to build a list of steady clients, unless they're in town frequently. This is unlike "normal" cities where the primary guests at clubs are residents of that city, so the hard work to cultivate clients pays off in the long term.
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#22
What's the deal with dress codes in Vegas clubs? In general I try avoiding places that force you to wear nice clothes (if I'm going to a crowded club with good music, wearing dress shoes is dumb). Are most places strict about this, or are there some good clubs that don't care?
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#23
(02-07-2020, 04:40 PM)mike Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 11:42 AM)zatara Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 12:49 AM)Dali Wrote: ^ I agree with most of what you said but Vegas is a bit different. Here's how the price becomes "justified".

[/snip for brevity]
Long write-up I know haha, but I've thought about this way too much...

That was a good/interesting post, thanks.

That does all make sense, up to a point. But at 600k a night for the DJ costs alone I'd just struggle to see how any club could ever make a profit. That eats far too much of the revenue, even in a large, packed club. As Kaos closing down after 6 months probably does show.

I know the DJs playing in Ibiza, in even more massive nightclubs, generally earn less than that. So I would suspect a big part of it is down to the Vegas clubs competing more aggressively with each other on talent wages than is necessary, driving up the cost for everyone beyond whats actually sustainable.

A lot of these clubs probably are not making a profit. I don't know anything about the club scene in Vegas, but at least in NYC it's common for clubs to shut down within a year or 2. It seems like a very difficult business model

Depends on the club.

Meatpacking District clubs have a very long shelf-life, feel like PhD hass been around forever and so has Le Bain.
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#24
(02-15-2020, 09:16 PM)mike Wrote: What's the deal with dress codes in Vegas clubs? In general I try avoiding places that force you to wear nice clothes (if I'm going to a crowded club with good music, wearing dress shoes is dumb). Are most places strict about this, or are there some good clubs that don't care?

Even though a lot of clubs claim to require collared shirts, nobody really cares as long as you're dressed for nightlife and fit a specific style, especially if you have presale tix. I used to always wear a button down though recently I switched over to a v-neck, jeans, and a blazer and have no problems (even without the blazer is fine).

Shoes-wise, you don't need dress shoes, but I would avoid wearing Nikes or shoes with white soles that are obviously not "dressy". I've worn solid-colored converse and vans before without issue, though my preference is black or brown boots that I'm not afraid to get a little scruffed up.
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#25
go no shoes = #gandhi game #MG style
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#26
What is your favorite casino?
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#27
One must wonder when things will get going in Las Vegas again. Flights from the east coast are very cheap for many summer dates right now.
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#28
(02-07-2020, 04:40 PM)mike Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 11:42 AM)zatara Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 12:49 AM)Dali Wrote: ^ I agree with most of what you said but Vegas is a bit different. Here's how the price becomes "justified".

[/snip for brevity]
Long write-up I know haha, but I've thought about this way too much...

That was a good/interesting post, thanks.

That does all make sense, up to a point. But at 600k a night for the DJ costs alone I'd just struggle to see how any club could ever make a profit. That eats far too much of the revenue, even in a large, packed club. As Kaos closing down after 6 months probably does show.

I know the DJs playing in Ibiza, in even more massive nightclubs, generally earn less than that. So I would suspect a big part of it is down to the Vegas clubs competing more aggressively with each other on talent wages than is necessary, driving up the cost for everyone beyond whats actually sustainable.

A lot of these clubs probably are not making a profit. I don't know anything about the club scene in Vegas, but at least in NYC it's common for clubs to shut down within a year or 2. It seems like a very difficult business model

Good point.  This has probably been the case since NYC's Studio 54 era before the vast majority of us were even born.

(02-15-2020, 09:21 PM)Here Are Words Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 04:40 PM)mike Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 11:42 AM)zatara Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 12:49 AM)Dali Wrote: ^ I agree with most of what you said but Vegas is a bit different. Here's how the price becomes "justified".

[/snip for brevity]
Long write-up I know haha, but I've thought about this way too much...

That was a good/interesting post, thanks.

That does all make sense, up to a point. But at 600k a night for the DJ costs alone I'd just struggle to see how any club could ever make a profit. That eats far too much of the revenue, even in a large, packed club. As Kaos closing down after 6 months probably does show.

I know the DJs playing in Ibiza, in even more massive nightclubs, generally earn less than that. So I would suspect a big part of it is down to the Vegas clubs competing more aggressively with each other on talent wages than is necessary, driving up the cost for everyone beyond whats actually sustainable.

A lot of these clubs probably are not making a profit. I don't know anything about the club scene in Vegas, but at least in NYC it's common for clubs to shut down within a year or 2. It seems like a very difficult business model

Depends on the club.

Meatpacking District clubs have a very long shelf-life, feel like PhD hass been around forever and so has Le Bain.

Reminds me of Sound-Bar in Chicago's River North area.  Not an "it-spot" these days, but it's still a pretty large nightclub in terms of sheer capacity & been open since the early 2000's.  They've had some on & off issues with violence in the vicinity too at times.

Chicago's River North area still has "The Underground" which at times can still be kind of tough to enter. Much smaller capacity. Lot of visiting & local celebs used to stop by the joint. Been open a long time as well.
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#29
I'm in Vegas now. I came before everything shut down and will stay for the time being. Right now Airbnb's and car rentals are extremely cheap. The entire Strip is shut down though, so there's not much you can do. It's not a bad place to be right now though. At least there's plenty of hiking trails you can go do. There's nothing else to do.
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#30
(03-30-2020, 02:00 AM)mike Wrote: I'm in Vegas now. I came before everything shut down and will stay for the time being. Right now Airbnb's and car rentals are extremely cheap. The entire Strip is shut down though, so there's not much you can do. It's not a bad place to be right now though. At least there's plenty of hiking trails you can go do. There's nothing else to do. 
One thing I am learning is that Vegas local girls are not great. The lack of income has not changed their perspective, nor has the absence of tourists. 


We will see how long that continues.
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#31
Ah man, doesn't seem like a great time to be in Vegas. From what I understand all of the hotels are shut down entirely (not just the casinos/clubs). Unemployment is going through the roof so all the locals are probably depressed and anxious - strippers and cocktail waitresses are not exactly known for advance planning. I hope that the hiking trails stay open though! There is also Zion, Bryce, and other national parks that are a 3-4 hour drive away and are incredible places to spend some time.

I am wondering how long it will take Vegas to get to normal post-COVID19. Clubs are as big of a breeding ground as anywhere for a contagious virus, so after the media has hammered the "social distancing" narrative for weeks on end, will people be down to go straight to the club once it is allowed to open?

My best guess is things get back to normal by August, but that's purely a guess.
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#32
Don't get me wrong, it's definitely not a good time to be in Vegas. Everything is closed. My point is that now it's better to be here than in a big city like NYC or LA.
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