The Indonesia Thread
(12-13-2020, 07:20 PM)Shifty Wrote:
(12-13-2020, 04:52 PM)churros Wrote: Great David Bond has found Indonesia. Get lost ruining destinations, youtuber scum.

I don't think it's actually him...

Then why use the name? He posted on RVF
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They have been issuing business/investor visas for a while now. It’s only tourism visas that are still not available
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Come on dude I’m obviously not David Bond...
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Basque -> Dragonfly was the go to. There were a few others like Immigrant that are now closed. There's a good number of clubs but few deliver the actual results of Basque and Dragonfly.

Despite the conservative culture, there's a lot of fucking going on.
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No entry of foreigners on any type of visa for the first 2 weeks of January:

https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2020...train.html

Unless you are a resident.
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What about those that already got their visa
They won't honor it to enter ?
and agents definitely won't refund your money

I can gurantee you this will extend further on from January 14. What a shit show
Not just Indonesia around the world all countries now
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Interesting article on the challenges of mental health treatment in Bali.

https://www.scmp.com/magazines/post-maga...ice-pasung
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Chaining the mentally ill in Indonesia has been in the news recently. Definitely some strange cultural practices. But is it worse than the US, where the mentally ill are often homeless? Its tough being a schizophrenic, even on a tropical island paradise.
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Thanks for sharing Suits. I live in Indonesia and was not aware of this practice. That's fucked.
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(01-08-2021, 03:50 AM)Blake2 Wrote: Chaining the mentally ill in Indonesia has been in the news recently. Definitely some strange cultural practices. But is it worse than the US, where the mentally ill are often homeless? Its tough being a schizophrenic, even on a tropical island paradise.

I'm not an expert on the topic, but my best guess is that every society could probably improve on how they deal with mental illness.

However, from what I understand many mentally ill homeless people in the US and Canada are in the circumstances that they are because they refuse to accept the services and treatment that is available. Not sure how accurate that is overall. Would love to hear from some members that are more knowledgeable on the topic, but that should be its own thread to avoid cluttering up this one.
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I wonder if Indo girls get the +1 muslim bump for being technically a muslim country.

Typical muslim women are easily the most loyal and put up with the most shit of any type or region of women.

Next, id say it's Asian women.

Muslim + Asian

I might have picked the wrong country to wife hunt lol
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I have more than enough experience with Muslim Indonesian girls to tell you that they can be just as slutty and unloyal as any girl. Of course I must add that these are girls who are open to foreigners to begin with. The traditional Muslim girls are much harder to crack because they are not going to go after foreigners in the first place.

There are tons of girls from all over the country who move to Bali, because Bali is Hindu and in Bali they can "be free" and not have to deal with the Muslim stuff from their families (i.e. they can go clubbing, get drunk and get smashed). Meanwhile the family has no clue and just think their daughter is in Bali for work. These girls get smashed by a different foreigner every weekend and then they go visit their home towns and I see IG pictures of them wearing hijabs and being good girls during family celebrations and religious ceremonies.

Even nationwide though, the gap between older and more traditional generations and the younger generations is getting wider and wider. Many young people don't want to put up with the religious stuff and rebel against it (either secretly or openly). I lost count of the amount of times girls complain to me about their families and how their father, brothers and uncles try to suppress them and make them obedient little Muslim women.

In terms of looking for a wife, make no mistake there either. First of all, in Indonesia you can't marry unless both parties have the same religion. Meaning you're going to be converting to Islam and reading passages of the Quran in Arabic to be approved as a converted Muslim. No thanks. And no, she's not going to convert to your religion instead, as the family will not allow it.

Second, you're going to be dealing with said family, who as mentioned above are likely going to be old school, traditional and in some cases try to influence your marriage and personal life in a big way. I know many examples of Western guys who have done this and the whole extended family situation is really wearing them down.

For me personally, if I ever end up wife hunting here then it's going to have to be a Christian Indonesian just so there is more cultural overlap and I don't have to deal with the Muslim bullshit. Christians are still about 10% of Indonesia so that's still 26 million people. Would consider a Balinese Hindu girl as well.
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^ good post very accurate
This gives me trust issues..them being sluts secretly or openly. then back to the hijabs the next week.not to mention some of them haven't been exposed to foreigmers yet and exposed to Bali culture. These so called good girls are just a day away from experiencing their hoe phase. I have no problem with this it's good for all us swoopers and part of new modern life everywhere in the world. But if you are trying to settle down then...

How can you accurately deal with all this and truly find a marriage material girl?.mistakenly wifing a ho or ex ho sounds horrible
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Feels like you either gotta make sacrifices on your end orr roll a dice and get lucky.
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(01-10-2021, 06:33 AM)Cazhyphd Wrote: not to mention some of them haven't been exposed to foreigmers yet and exposed to Bali culture. These so called good girls are just a day away from experiencing their hoe phase.


I see this all the time too. There's many girls who genuinely are innocent and unspoiled and who genuinely do go to Bali in order to find a job.

When they get there, they get exposed to all the debauchery going on and start participating.

I have personally met girls who tell me they are blown away by the possibilities in Bali, that their home town in the middle of fuck knows where does not even HAVE a night club or drinking establishment.

Its amazing to see how fast some of them get used to this new situation and indeed develop slut behavior.
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Yup sounds about right
It's all part of the game. I can't be bothered or take that seriously.
So what tips and advice would you have if we are trying to get out the game, how to find that ride or die type.

Like you mentioned you found that "innocent" unspoiled"..as soon as she gets into western countries /culture. It's a total switch up on you lol.

I'm in no rush to settle but this is interesting discussion for me and others that we can use in our future. Do we want to be swooping forever until we're old fucks ? I don't know
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(01-09-2021, 01:19 PM)Dash Wrote: I wonder if Indo girls get the +1 muslim bump for being technically a muslim country.

Typical muslim women are easily the most loyal and put up with the most shit of any type or region of women.

Next, id say it's Asian women.

Muslim + Asian

I might have picked the wrong country to wife hunt lol

Striking out in Vietnam huh?
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(01-10-2021, 08:49 AM)Il Bersagliere Wrote:
(01-09-2021, 01:19 PM)Dash Wrote: I wonder if Indo girls get the +1 muslim bump for being technically a muslim country.

Typical muslim women are easily the most loyal and put up with the most shit of any type or region of women.

Next, id say it's Asian women.

Muslim + Asian

I might have picked the wrong country to wife hunt lol

Striking out in Vietnam huh?

Is that even possible?

You see inbred looking incels with gf/wives here. 

Even Indians can find something.

I am just curious about the muslim + asian dynamic.
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Been in Jakarta over a month now. Its good for the first month but then its a fucking slow grind. The girls here have some nasty attitudes as well, even the 6's. Been abused, stalked, one even said she's going to send a hitman after me lol. Most of them are fucking bitches and seem pretty entitled. The ones who have been to bali several times are the worst cause they've had heaps of white dick through them, so they are entitled cunts with huge egos. Lots of gold diggers and prostitutes... I get like 10 messages a day on tinder saying "Hi Mr, you want massage and make love?". fucking annoying. So many girls asking for taxi money as well. Didn't expect to get that shit here.

Good at first, but then it really burns you out. Can anyone recommend another town that has girls with nicer attitude? Filipinas are much nicer... never get any attitude from them.
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There’s probably between 30,000-50,000 girls that got displaced when all of the entertainment venues got closed last year, whilst a lot of them would have gone back to their villages there will still be a huge number of them online plying their trade.

With the expat exodus and tighter restrictions on coming in a lot of the other expats using online probably have cars and drivers so they would be sent home with that.

You will probably get better traction not using online, you may have to be creative.

You might want to try Bandung, it’s probably raining even more than here though
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Protip: If you're going to play fast and loose with immigration rules (and paying taxes), probably best not to broadcast it on Twitter.

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/economics...ali-really

Quote:How a US woman’s ‘elevated lifestyle’ tweet showed what Bali really thinks of privileged Western tourists
  • Online fury directed at 28-year-old digital nomad Kristen Gray accuses her of exploiting island’s friendly ways for her own selfish purposes
  • A Balinese social activist said the incident had ‘opened a tap of emotions’ in many, exposing their true feelings about tourists and digital hipsters
The social media firestorm ignited by an American “digital nomad” who promoted the perks of living in Bali for foreigners has revealed the frustrations that many Indonesians feel about the local government’s relentless pursuit of tourism to drive the economy, which has left residents with little else now that the Covid-19 pandemic has disrupted travel.

Indonesian internet users this past week accused 28-year-old Kristen Gray – who went on Twitter to promote her US$30 e-book on how to move to Bali for an “elevated lifestyle at a lower cost of living” while skirting Indonesia’s current entry ban for foreigners – of exploiting Western privilege and contributing to the island’s gentrification.

Immigration authorities in the world’s largest Muslim-majority nation, where support for homosexuality is very low, assailed her promotion of an LGBT lifestyle in Bali, where most residents are Hindu. Only 9 per cent of Indonesians agree that homosexuality is acceptable, according to a June 2019 survey by Pew research centre.

Gray, who said she had struggled with being black and queer in the United States, listed the benefits of Bali as “safety, low cost of living, luxury lifestyle, queer friendly, [and the] Black in Bali community.”

Her rent cost US$400 she said, and she had started a graphic design business. Besides her e-book, which includes “direct links to our visa agents and how to go about getting into Indonesia during Covid”, she was also offering 45-minute consultations to those thinking of making the move to the tropical island at a cost of US$50.

Indonesia currently bans the entry of foreigners, except for diplomats, over concerns about coronavirus transmission and the risks from the more contagious Covid-19 variant that was found in Britain.

The backlash against Gray comes after a series of incidents last year of foreigners violating Covid-19 protocols for not wearing masks, holding a mass yoga session and private parties, or flouting their tourist visas by doing business on the island of 4.3 million.

In December, two Russian social media influencers created a video where they deliberately drove a motorcycle into the ocean in Nusa Penida, a snorkelling and diving hotspot in Bali, in a bid to gain followers. They are being deported this weekend.

The island, which has recorded 22,754 coronavirus cases, has struggled to keep a lid on infections after reopening to domestic tourists in August. There have been widespread reports of staff in the decimated hospitality industry losing their jobs and having to return to their hometowns outside Bali or turning to farming.

Gus Dark, a Balinese artist who focuses on environmental and social issues, said the Kristen Gray incident had “opened a tap of emotions” in many, exposing their true feelings about tourism in Bali, which is known for its serenity, breathtaking views and surf beaches. In 2019, it had more than 16 million visitors, of whom 6.3 million were foreigners.

In recent years, it has burnished its appeal as a haven for young, digitally-savvy travellers who could still run businesses or hold down jobs by working out of affordable, modern villas, co-working spaces or trendy cafes, while at the same time enjoying laid-back lifestyles with beaches and rice fields at their doorsteps. Their only needs: a laptop and high-speed internet connection.

“Many foreigners [in Bali] have felt like they have diplomatic immunity just because a small number of locals ordained them as ‘little kings’,” Gus told This Week in Asia, saying the Balinese had “pent-up feelings” about the government’s pursuit of tourism while overlooking its negative impacts.

Gray’s tweets, which she eventually deleted, also sparked allegations that she had overstayed her visa and was not paying taxes on income derived from her business. When Gray responded to a Twitter user by saying she did not need to pay taxes in Indonesia because her tax residency was the US, the responses came fast and furious.

A user with the handle @redfolklore criticised foreigners on Bali for living in “luxury” while working on tourists visas and not paying taxes, while at the same time “locals were struggling” just to buy food.

The minimum monthly wage in Bali is 2.5 million rupiah (US$177).

Indonesian immigration authorities, who clarified that Gray’s visa was valid until January 24, ultimately decided to deport her and her girlfriend, Saundra Michelle Alexander, because Gray’s promotion of Bali as LGBT-friendly had “unsettled society”, and because she had advertised “easy access to enter Indonesia in the pandemic.”

In interviews with local and international media outlets, Gray said she believed she was being sent back to the US because “I put out a statement about LGBT and I’ve been deported because I’m LGBT”.

She and her girlfriend were deported on Thursday, and are now back in the US.

Ni Luh Djelantik, a social activist who lives on Bali, welcomed the news of her deportation, calling foreigners like Gray “trash tourists”.
“Thanks Bali Immigration for reaffirming and enforcing the law so the nation’s dignity isn’t trampled by those who misuse and misunderstand Indonesians’ friendliness as a greenlight to do whatever they want,” Ni Luh said to her over 300,000 followers on Instagram.

Gray is not the first foreigner to be deported from Bali for overstaying her visa. In June, a Syrian national was deported for holding a mass yoga retreat – attended by more than 60 foreigners – amid the pandemic. In July, two Russians were deported for holding paid yoga classes while they were on tourists visa, and in August, an Italian was deported for using his tourist visa to open an online spiritual service.

Entitled foreigners are a dime a dozen in Bali, but those who perform “outlandish” acts that hurt people, the environment and the culture reflect how some tourists are attracted more by getting attention on social media than knowing Balinese culture, said Anton Muhajir, a member of the online citizens’ journalism portal Bale Bengong.

“These incidents show that the tourism quality in Bali has been declining. Many tourists who came to Bali don’t really enjoy Bali because they only care about content” for their online postings, Anton said. “They don’t want to know what a pura [Balinese temple] is, why some temples were located in particular places, what are their relevance to Balinese culture, so they’re only interested in the destination’s visual appeal.”

In 2019, a Czech couple were criticised online after they shared a video on Instagram of the man splashing the woman’s rear end with holy water from Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary in Ubud, central Bali.

Gus Dark said that foreigners may be feeling entitled to do whatever they want in Bali due to the perceived leniency to tourists.

“Too many foreigners in Bali have violated rules, but they walk away because they can say that they don’t read the existing rules” or can count on “selective law enforcement” by the police, Gus said.

“Bali does depend on tourism, but to me, respectful tourism is better than mass tourism that is now being promoted by the central government,” he said. “Some cases [involving foreigners] in Bali have been swept under the rug to maintain the good name of Bali, Indonesia’s main selling point for tourism.”

Gus said he regretted that international publications reporting on Gray’s deportation had linked it to her sexual orientation, but he blamed immigration authorities for suggesting that Bali was not LGBT-friendly.

He said acceptance of the LGBT community was “not a problem”, since Balinese culture has recognised “third gender” people within society for thousands of years.

Personally, I don't blame the locals for despising the "digital nomad types." The ones I've run into in Thailand have usually struck me as smug Instagram whores who like to brag about "living walking distance from a beach" but haven't learned three words in the local language.
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